Michael Quigley
American History
Professor Martin
April 3, 2014

Segregation in Public Schools in the 1950s
Introduction
As Olson (2007) denotes, every country was founded on certain events which took place in the past. Those events that took place in the past at different timing, monthly, yearly or even in intervals of compounded years, they were grouped together to form what people refer today as history. The events related to how people lived and existed in those ancient times. History was comprised of events such as politics, economy and innovations. Different countries had their own different history which formed the basis for revolution in those nations. Basing the historical research interest to a specific country, this paper seeks to explore the history of United States of America. The history is quite broad and that is why the study is narrowed down to the events that occurred between 1865 and 1990s, and to be specific the spotlight is on segregation in U.S public schools during the 1950s Era (Olson 198).
Focusing the analysis on the timeline stated above, the exploration falls under the 19th century. According to Hillstrom (2000), the year of 1865 was marked by a major step towards peace and humans right acquisition. In 1865, 9th of April, the American Civil War ended after the involved army generals decided to surrender to each other. This marked the end of legalized slavery system in this country, giving way for peace in the country. America in turn became a powerful and united nation described by a strong federal government. Those people who had been subjected to slavery were able to gain citizenship under this new regime of non-slavery. This event formed a cross-over bridge from slavery to a democratic free country, which had peace and enforced human rights. The cause of the civil war was due to the withdrawal of the southern states from the slave trade union. This left the northern states in the union (Hillstrom 246).
Grant (2009)

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