Schizophrenia and It's Treatments

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Schizophrenia and It’s
This paper will go over the basics of what schizophrenia. The various types of treatments that are available for patients with Schizophrenia will be covered more in depth.

Treatments

“To be a schizophrenic it is best summed up in a repeating dream that I have had since childhood. In this dream I am lying on a beautiful sunlit beach but my body is in pieces . . . . I realize that the tide is coming in and that I am unable to gather the parts of my dismembered body together to run away. . . . This to me is what schizophrenia feels like; being fragmented in one’s personality and constantly afraid that the tide of illness will completely cover me (Quoted in Rollin, 1980).” (Carole Wade, 2002) Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder where a person suffers from delusions, hallucinations, disturbing behavior, cognitive impairments and disorganized speech. Persons suffering from this disease normally discover they have this disease during their late childhood to their early adulthood. Schizophrenia is a rare disease and there are very few well known cases of someone suffering from schizophrenia. A famous or well known person that suffers from this uncommon disease is John Nash, known for the movie about his life, A Beautiful Mind. He was a Nobel Prize winning mathematician that currently teaches at Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. Abraham Lincoln’s wife, Syd Barret of Pink Floyd, Lionel Aldridge a superbowl-winning athlete, Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac and Albert Einstein’s son are a few more people that also suffer from schizophrenia. Originally, researchers believed that schizophrenia came from “being raised by an erratic, cold, rejecting mother or from living in an unpredictable environment . . .” (Carole Wade, 2002) Now it is believed that this disorder comes from a genetic problem that affect your brain and is often developed at birth or during a child’s adolescence. There is currently no known cure for schizophrenia.



Cited: APA P Kahn, P. a. (1993). The Encyclopedia of Mental Health Second Edition. New York: Facts on File. Armand M. Nicholi, J. M. (1999). The Harvard Guide to Psychiatry 3rd Edition. Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Carole Wade, C. T. (2002). Invitation to Psycology Fourth Edition. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education, Inc. David B. Jacoby, M. (1991). Encyclopedia of Family Health Third Edition. New York, London, Singapore: Marshal Cavendish Corperation. Max Fink, M. a. (2002). American Experience. Retrieved November 21, 2010, from A Brilliant Madness: www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/nash/filmmore/ps_ict.html Robert J Bryg, M. (2009, December). Low Blood Pressuse Overview and Causes. Retrieved November 17, 2010, from Web MD: www.webmd.com/heart/understanding-low-blood-pressure-basics.com Schizophrenia: WebNet. (2010, September 10). Retrieved November 11, 2010, from WebNet: www.medecinenet.com/schizophrenia/article.htm

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