Schizophrenia

Good Essays
The Case of Schizophrenia
Spencer Surjue-Bowens
Pysch410
Prof Nyiema Carter
February 6, 2013

Dr. John Hunter, a noted therapist asserts that Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by a breakdown of thought processes and by poor emotional responsiveness (Hunter, 2003). Symptoms may include auditory hallucinations, paranoid or bizarre delusions, or disorganized speech and thinking, and is accompanied by significant social or occupational dysfunction. This disorder mainly affects cognition and emotions and is likely to have co morbid conditions such as major depression and anxiety. A person with schizophrenia is also likely to have social problems for example, long-term unemployment, poverty, and homelessness. In the case of “Sally”, a child who was born with schizophrenia due to extremely harsh birth conditions. Her problems were not realized until she had gone to college. Sally was a miracle child whose fate was sewn long before she was born. Her mother which was a two pack a day smoker had also undergone a severe flu while she was pregnant. t Sally had an eccentric Grandfather grew up in a dysfunctional living space. It seemed inevitable. She was predisposed to schizophrenia. Sally did not develop as fast as “normal” children, she chronologically challenged for her age. Sally’s intelligence was above average. However, she began to withdraw from studying and fell into behavior of fantasy. Sally’s mother seemed to be overbearing and controlling. Sally showed peculiar behavior. This seemed to cause her mother to isolate her from socializing. As Sally grew older, she became more socially inept and distant and her behavior was off center. While Sally attended college, her bout with schizophrenia surfaced. Her new surroundings became too stressful for her to handle and she began to talk to herself and eventually grew unresponsive. Sally would sit in her room for hours in the same position, looking at the floor and being moved about as if she



References: Hunter, J (2003). Dealing With Mental Health In the 21st Century. University of Glassgow, Scotland. Colgove, Melba (2002). Prelude Press. Myers, F (2005). Treating Varied Forms of Schizophrenia Using Medication and Psychotherapy. Psychology Publication Today. April 2003. New York. Sammuels, M (2003). Hypothesis of Psychotherapy and Mental Health. Psychological Manuscript. May, 2004. New York.

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