Sally Satel's Organ for Sale.

Powerful Essays
An Analysis of passion: Sally Satel’s “Organs for Sale” Sally Satel is an American psychiatrist based in Washington DC. She is a lecturer at the Yale University School of Medicine, the W.H. Brady Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and author. Books written by Satel include P.C. M.D.: How Political Correctness is Corrupting Medicine and Drug Treatment: The Case for Coercion Her articles have been published in The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and in scholarly publications like Policy Review on topics including psychiatry and addiction. Satel also serves on the advisory committee of the Center for Mental Health Services of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. After being diagnosed in 2004 with chronic renal failure, Virginia Postrel, a friend and also a writer donated a kidney to Satel on March 4, 2006. Satel adopts an unbiased tone in order to appeal to the emotional feelings of the People of United States by carefully outlining reasons to back her argument most of which were personal experiences. Her argument appeared in the journal of the American Enterprise Institute on October 14, 2006 which was written after the essay “transplant policy” in the journal. The American Enterprise Institute is one of the oldest and most influential publications in United States. Satel’s journal was read by millions of Americans which pointed out the little or no risk that is involved in organ donation. “The risk a donor runs is that a single functioning kidney will become deceased or injured, and he’ll need a transplant himself—a highly unlikely event”(Satel 451).
Satel begins her contemporary argument ‘organs for sale” by talking about her past experience when in need of a kidney, she talked about how frustrating it could be waiting for a kidney while decisions by potential donors are changed. The argument appeared in the journal of the American Enterprise Institution on October 14, 2006. She appeals to the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    resume

    • 1378 Words
    • 6 Pages

    3.Quotation from the essay w/Parenthetical Reference- Satel says, "If we really want to increase the supply of organs, we need to try incentives- financial and otherwise." (129. Par. 6) Here in this statement Satel uses logic to prove that if people are given something they would enjoy, In return they will become an organ donor. "Many transplant experts recognize this, proposing initiatives that would allow people to give their organs in exchange for tax breaks , guaranteed health insurance, college scholarships for their children, deposits in their retirement accounts, and so on... the Presidents Council on Bloethics and others, have begun discussing the virtues of such incentives." (129. Par.7) This evidence proves that the Auther is not the only person who thinks incentives should be given and if enough people think there should be initiatives, then it may happen.…

    • 1378 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Compensating donors for organ donations is one of the most controversial debates we have today. The shortage of organ donations in America is the one of the main reason there is a sudden drive to supplement the possible sources of organs. It first began with the move from donations of organs from cadaver to donations from living donors, and no the debate is rerisen, to the possibility of building a market for organ donations with a financial incentive.…

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    organs will save lives

    • 911 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In the essay “Organ Sales Will Save Lives” by Joanna MacKay, kidney failure is the main topic. In her thesis, MacKay states that, “Governments should not ban the sale of human organs; they should regulate it (92).” The thesis is supported by one main reason: it will save lives. In America 350,000 people struggle each year from this situation. MacKay also states that with the legal selling of organs, more people will be willing to give up their kidneys. There are also other ways to save lives like dialysis, but this situation would only be for a temporary time period, transplant is definitely the way to go. People in third world countries are extremely willing to sell their kidneys because they need the money (94). MacKay points out that there is a black market for selling kidneys for $150,000 because it is illegal to sell organs in many countries (93). The broker who arranges the sale, takes advantage of uneducated poor people who are in desperate need of money, only paying them around $1,000 for a kidney (93). People around the world also donate kidneys from the good of their heart; these people have very good moral reasoning’s. She then goes on to talk about the pros and cons of this transplant and how everybody gains except the patient. The workers in the hospitals are paid to do the operation, the person who needs the kidney walks away with one, and the donor is left with nothing. The Government could also regulate this transaction to help make the donors receive money, this way there would be more kidneys up for grab. In her essay Mackay uses statistics and accurate evidence to get through to the readers how she feels about the cause and effect of this operation in modern day.…

    • 911 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Satel claims that there is a problem with organ donations. In order to prove this she begins her argument by stating that the wait for a kidney in a big city, “is five to eight years and expected to double by 2010.”(2) Well, it is now 2012 and it still takes the same amount of time to get a kidney transplant. The time did not double like Satel claimed it would. As a matter a fact according to the U.S department of Health & Human Services only 11,329 people have to wait 5 or more years for a kidney transplant. This number is way less than the 70,000 Satel lead the reader to believe. The statistic evidence which satel provides seems legitimate but the assumptions she makes because of them do not quite add up.…

    • 1081 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Persuasive Organ Donation

    • 575 Words
    • 3 Pages

    June 3, 1993, marked a day of tragedy for the Cassani family after their fourteen month-old son, Colby, drowned and later died. In mourning the parents of Colby chose to donate their son’s organs which saved the lives of three other individuals (“Colby Cassani”). From a sorrowful calamity of a lost life sprang a gift to those in need of the functioning organs. However, despite the lifesaving potential the newly deceased could offer, the topic of organ donation seems blissfully overlooked by the general public. Scarcely brought to the public’s attention, many individuals, ignorant of organ donations, are provoked to form speculations and myths about this charitable donation of life. Although the subject of organ donation is often disregarded by people and is deeply synonymous with several fallacies, everyone should become an organ donor due to this gift of life.…

    • 575 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Richard A. Epstein puts forth a very convincing argument on selling organs; he brings up many factors which could persuade you to think the way he does on the issue of selling organs. Epstein argues that we should legalize selling organs. He presents both sides of the argument as well as a rebuttal to the opposite side of the issue.…

    • 509 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The trade of organs has been a controversial issue for a long time all over the world. The article “Why Selling Kidneys Should Be Legal” is published by The New York Times in December, 2011. The article is written in an effective manner to attract the audience and argue for the legalization of selling kidneys and compensation for donors. By using personal experience to grab the audience’s attention, with the aid of false analogies as well as rhetorical techniques, the article is relatively effective in sharing information of kidney trade and persuading the audience to legalize the selling of kidney.…

    • 919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    If it is morally valuable for me to receive a kidney, objectivity requires that the donation of a kidney to someone else also be considered morally valuable. The ‘organ taker’ must decide whether they would be willing to perform the same morally valuable act as they…

    • 806 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    In modern medicine societies, organ transplantation is an opportunity to save peoples’ lives. The downside of organ transplantation is that the demand for organs outweighs the supply. This becomes morally challenging in the context for those who participate in a market as a solution due to the lack of available organs. A market is the selling of organs, which is an unlawful practice in many parts of the world. It is a transaction between those who are seeking for organs to arrange with brokers, and procure organs from those who exist in impoverished, underdeveloped countries. An effort to increase the organ pool is to offer a financial inducement for the organ vendors. The ethical issue of this strategy is that donors no longer participate for altruistic reasons but decide to become vendors, for financial purposes, which means to partake in a commodity for material gain.…

    • 1544 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In the essay “Organ Sales Will Save Lives” by Joana Mackay, kidney failure is the main topic in this essay. Honestly, I did not really have an opinion on organ sales. It just knew a bit about it. However, after I read this essay, I felt like I completely agreed with her argument. She argues that the sale of human organs should be legal. As we learned, some key features in an argument include a clear and arguable position, necessary background information, and convincing evidence. In Mackay’s essay, at the very beginning of the essay, she clearly states her position, which is “Governments should not ban the sales of human organs; they should regulate it.” Throughout the entire essay she gives a lot of reasons about why she believe that the sale of human organs should be legal. Also, she pointed out that there is a black market where people can purchase and sell kidney by a very good deal. Meanwhile “there are over 60,000 people on the waiting list for kidneys, and it takes an average of 10 years for your waiting to end”, in black market, they don’t have to wait a line for ten years. This is very surprising. This evidence stood out the most for me because I did not know that people have to wait for 10 year to get a kidney. Furthermore, in the third world countries, they are willing to sell their kidney, which cost about $1000. Sadly, because they need money to by food and clothing for their family, so they are willing to do anything to get money even sale their kidney. It is so sad to know about…

    • 281 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Sally Satel

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Sally Satel’s argument in “Death’s Waiting List”, states that there is an extreme lack of organ donors in this society. “70,000 Americans are waiting for kidneys, according to The United Network for Organ Sharing” and “only about 16,000 people received one last year. “ In large cities, where the ratio of acceptable organs to needy patients is worst, the wait is five to eight years and is expected to double by 2014 “. There is no reason why the wait should be this long because any one can be an organ donor and Satel does a great job of explaining the benefits throughout in her essay.…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In Alexander T. Tabarrok’s essay, “A Moral Solution to the Organ Shortage” Alexander explains ways to find solutions to the organ shortage by proposing a fair way to go about qualifying for organ transplant. Gary Becker suggested that paying a good amount of money toward funeral cost of organ donors would help and encourage people to donate their organs. The new rule that Alexander wanted to proposed is the “no -give - no - take” rule. Under this rule in order to receive an organ a person must have previously signed their organ donor card. Under “no - give - no take”, signing your organ donor card is like joining the club, the club of people who have agreed to share their organs. People have different views when it comes to donating organs. Some have their doubts about becoming an organ donor because of their religious beliefs, while others thinks that by signing an organ donor card it’s same as buying an insurance . NOTE In some ways I agree with Alexander on this new rule that he has proposed ( UNOS). Having a donor card is a good idea to make sure there is surplus of organs able to be donated. I’m not convinced that the “no- give no - take” rule will be productive to solve the shortage of our organ donors any time soon, since Alexander’s essay was based on suggestion. As for myself I would have doubt of donating my organs not because of my religion or beliefs, but the trust of the people that handling my organs. This essay has inspired me to rethink being an organ donor because of the problems of most organizations. In my own views, paying tremendous amounts of money to organ donors to saved someones life is a wrong way to help people that in need. As time progresses and suggestions becomes reality I would be more confident in donating my organs. NOTE…

    • 317 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Deaths Waiting List

    • 1260 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Immediately in the essay, Satel uses pathos to draw in the reader. The first two sentences of her essay read, “March was National Kidney Month. I did my part: I got a new one” (Satel 128). Satel’s bluntness with her situation sets a tone of sorrow and pity that entangles the audience into the roller coaster ride that is Sally Satel’s unfortunate health. Subsequently, in the essay she uses pathos wisely again when she examines the Institute of Medicine’s report “Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action”. Satel believes not enough is being recommended for donees in this report, and she let on that…

    • 1260 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In MacKay’s essay, “Organ Sales Will Save Lives,” she states that legalizing the sale of human organs will save millions of lives. Instead of prohibiting the sale of human organs, she believes the government should make it legal and manage the process. Kidney transplantation or dialysis is the only treatments available for people suffering from renal failure (MacKay 157). Dialysis is temporary and it has horrific side effects. Whereas, a kidney transplant offers a permanent solution. According to MacKay, there are not many people willing to donate their kidney without some form of compensation (157). Therefore, patients are desperately turning to the black market to purchase a kidney from a living donor. Although…

    • 582 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Organs For Sale Summary

    • 1135 Words
    • 5 Pages

    “Organs for Sale” is an argument written in response to the on-going ethical debate of a market-based incentive program to meet the rising demands of organ transplants. With many on the waiting list for new organs and few organs being offered, the author, Sally Satel, urges for legalization of payment to organ donors. Once in need of a new kidney herself, Sally writes of the anguish she encountered while facing three days a week on dialysis and the long wait on the UNOS list with no prospective willing donors in sight. She goes on to list several saddening researched facts on dialysis patients survival rates, length of time on the UNOS wait list, and registered as well as deceased donor numbers. While Sally is…

    • 1135 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays