Rumspringa

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Rumspringa is a Pennsylvanian Dutch term the Amish use for the German word “raum”, which translates to “running around outside the bounds” . Rumspringa is practiced on Christian
Amish settlements and is a period of time when some unbaptized Amish teenagers usually around the ages of sixteen to nineteen years old, leave their Amish communities temporarily, to explore “The real world”.Rumspringa consists of teenagers dressing in “English” style clothing, for example jeans and T-shirts , going to the mall or movies, listen to music or cellphone use, partying, drug or alcohol use, sexual activity, etc. When the rumspringa is over, the person must choose to either become a Baptized lifelong member of the Amish church or leave their family and community.

According to Essentials of sociology chapter three- during the course of socialization, children learn the way of their elders, carrying on their values, norms, and social practices. For example,
Amish children learning and practicing their elder’s values and norms and participating in social practices like Rumspringa. The Amish also participate in a lot of social roles or expectations in your certain position. For example, females will cook and clean, they are passive and confined while males are strong and outdoorsy, and get into adventurous pursuits. Rumspringa is like a rite of passage in the sense that it’s an Amish persons time to venture the world and let loose before they settle down in their new validated role in society.

The Amish learn their self-identity in Rumspringa through exploration and experiences that help define who they really are. The Amish are like functionalists because they are fixed on what they believe in and their ways have been unchanged- refusing to use electricity, cars, views on men’s and women’s gender roles, rites of passage; Rumspringa, etc. The Amish’s Rumspringa proves to be successful with over an 80 percent retention rate. When the

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