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RSA Exam

By dawadisuren Aug 04, 2014 10133 Words
SITHFAB201
Provide Responsible Service of Alcohol

By the end of this program you will be able to –
 Sell or serve alcohol responsibly
 Assist customers to drink within appropriate limits
 Assess alcohol affected customers and identify
customers to whom sale or service must be refused

 Refuse to provide alcohol

What is Alcohol?
Liquor is a spirituous or fermented fluid of an intoxicating nature intended for human consumption. Alcohol (or ethanol)
is also an addictive drug, however, and its misuse is
associated with a wide range of dose related adverse
consequences that can lead to significant harm to the
individual and society. Its consumption in moderation can lead to feelings of relaxation and euphoria, causing it to be
consumed widely in many social scenarios and across the
socio-economic spectrum.

The Path of Alcohol in the body
1. Mouth: alcohol enters the body
2. Stomach: some alcohol gets into the
bloodstream in the stomach, but most
goes on to the small intestine
3. Small Intestine: alcohol enters the
bloodstream through the walls of the
small intestine

Continued..

The Path of Alcohol in the body
4. Heart: pumps alcohol throughout the
body

5. Brain: alcohol reaches the brain
6. Liver: alcohol is oxidized by the liver
at a rate of about 0.5 oz. per hour
7. Alcohol is converted into water,
carbon dioxide and energy

What is alcoholic beverage?
An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing alcohol.
Alcoholic beverages are divided into three general
classes: beers, wines, and spirits.

Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA)
RSA means acting within law by dispensing alcohol in a
responsible manner, being aware of your duty of care
towards patrons, other workers and general community.
Responsible service of alcohol involves encouraging
customers to drink within appropriate limits. This limits may vary depending on the physical and mental state of the
person, however, the law indicates that 0.05 blood
alcohol level is a standard.

Adverse effect of alcohol
In Australian society, the most widely used drug is Alcohol
and production and consumption of alcoholic products
makes a significant contribution to the economy. But on the
other hand, alcohol abuse leads to various serious problems
to the community like social and economic issues, health
issues, reduced workplace productivity, accidents, drink
driving, violence, loss of life and other forms of crime. All the alcohol abuse adds up huge costs to the Australian
economy.

Type of people which are at higher risk than
others, from the adverse effect of alcohol
 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders
 Minors
 Women

 Young customers
 People from non-English speaking backgrounds

 People affected by the consumption of illicit & other drugs

Why RSA?
With the help of responsible service of alcohol practices and training, we can reduce the problem of alcohol abuse and also the costs associated with it.
It is the responsibility of a person who is servicing alcohol to give accurate information to customers on alcoholic beverages in accordance with house policy and government regulations.
The information can include about –


Types



Strengths



Standard drinks



Alcoholic percentages of a range of frequently served drinks

Benefits of RSA
 For customer – safer environment, stay longer and
improved health
 For premises and staff serving alcohol – reduced cost
for security, safer workplace and staff wouldn’t have to deal with bad customers, reduced legal problems
 For the community – less complaints, reduced violence
and less

Blood Alcohol Content (BAC)/ Blood Alcohol
Level
It is usually expressed as percentage of alcohol i.e. a
BAC of 0.05 means 0.05% (one-twentieth of one
percent) of a person’s blood, by volume is alcohol.
The law indicates that 0.05 blood alcohol level is a
standard.

Factors affecting BAC of different people or
why some people get drunk quickly?
 Gender

 Fitness and health

 No food

 Emotional state

 Rate of consumption

 Drinking through straw

 Mixing drinks

 Drinking under sun

 Drink strength

 Weakness drink i.e. some
people get drunk quicker
with some particular drinks

 Drugs

 Medication

Effect of Alcohol by BAC Level
BAC Level Effect
0.10 - 0.50 Average individual appears normal
Mild euphoria, talkativeness, decreased inhibitions, decreased 0.30 - 1.20
attention, impaired judgment, increased reaction time
Emotional instability, loss of critical judgment, impairment of memory 0.90 - 2.50 and comprehension, decreased sensory response, mild muscular incoordination
Confusion, dizziness, exaggerated emotions (anger, fear, grief) impaired visual perception, decreased pain sensation, impaired 1.80 - 3.00
balance, staggering gait, slurred speech, moderate muscular
incoordination
Apathy, impaired consciousness, stupor, significantly decreased 2.70 - 4.00 response to stimulation, severe muscular incoordination, inability to stand or walk, vomiting, incontinence of urine and feces

Unconsciousness, depressed or abolished reflexes, abnormal body 3.50 - 5.00
temperature, coma, possible death from respiratory paralysis

Alcohol content in different drinks
Drink

Alcohol content

Light beer

Less than 3.0%

Mid strength beer

Between 3.0% and 3.5%

Full strength beer

Greater than 3.5%

Wine

Less than 14.0% normally

Fortified wine

Approximately 18% (Wine with distilled spirit)

Spirits

Can be 40% or more

What is a Standard Drink?
Different drinks contain different amounts of alcohol.
The concept of a 'standard drink' is a measure not of
how much liquid has been consumed, but how much
pure alcohol has entered the system.
According to National Health and Medical Research
Council (NHMRC) a standard drink is any drink that
contains approximately 10 grams of alcohol.

1 Standard Drink =
 285 ml of full strength beer
 375 ml of mid strength beer

 425 ml of light beer
 100 ml of red/white/sparkling wine
 60 ml of fortified wine
 30 ml of spirit
 1 standard shot

Recommendations
For men
 Average of maximum 4 standard drinks a day and
maximum of 6 standard drinks on any one day

 One or two alcohol free days per week
For women
 Average of maximum 2 standard drinks a day and
maximum of 4 standard drinks on any one day
 One or two alcohol free days per week

Calculating Standard Drink
If standard drink information is not provided, then one can easily calculate a standard drink with the help of following formula –

* The specific gravity of ethyl alcohol is 0.789
For example, 425 ml of full strength beer (4.8% of alcohol by volume) –
0.425

X

4.8

X

0.789

=

1.6

Penalties - Maximum Fines for
Licensee, and Managers
Action

Fine

Supplying liquor to a minor
Supplying liquor to a person who is unduly intoxicated
Supplying liquor to a person who is disorderly
Not ensuring that minor are not on the premises
Licensee failing to remove minor on licensed premises
Sale of liquor after authorised trading hours
Allowing liquor to be consumed on premises after authorised hours Allowing liquor to be removed from premises after authorised hours Failure to confiscate fake ID and give to an investigator

$27,500
$55,000
$55,000
$11,000
$11,000
$11,000
$11,000
$11,000
$2,750

Failure to give or give false name, age or address
Failure to answer questions asked by an investigator
Obstructing an investigator
Contravening a condition of a license or permit
Make a false or misleading statement

$2,750
$11,000
$22,000
$4,400
$11,000

Penalties - Maximum Fines for
Bar/Security and Other Staff
Action

Fine

Supplying liquor to a minor

$8,800

Supplying liquor to a person who is unduly intoxicated

$8,800

Supplying liquor to a person who is disorderly

$8,800

Allowing a minor to enter the premises

$11,000

Failure to confiscate fake ID and give to an investigator

$2,750

Failure to give or give false name, age or address

$2,750

Failure to answer other questions asked by an investigator

$11,000

Obstructing an investigator

$22,000

Make a false or misleading statement

$11,000

Penalties - Maximum Fines for Patrons
Action
Non-exempt minor on licensed premises
Minor consuming or possessing liquor on a licensed premises
Minor falsely representing himself or herself to be of age
Supplying liquor to a minor
Supplying liquor to a person who is unduly intoxicated
Supplying liquor to a person who is disorderly
Giving ‘acceptable evidence of age’ to another person
Defacing or interfering with ‘acceptable evidence of age’ Drunk or disorderly on licensed premises
Person resisting eviction by a licensee
Hindrance of a licensee
Failure to give or give false name, age or address
Failure to answer other questions asked by an investigator
Failure to answer other questions asked by an investigator
Obstructing an investigator
Make a false or misleading statement

Fine
$2,750
$2,750
$2,750
$8,800
$8,800
$8,800
$4,400
$4,400
$2,750
$2,750
$11,000
$2,750
$2,750
$11,000
$22,000
$11,000

Alcohol and health in Australia
Alcohol is responsible for a considerable burden of
death, disease and injury in Australia. Drinking is a
major factor in much of the injury resulting from road
crashes and other accidents, and in social problems
such as violence, family breakdown and child abuse
and neglect. As such, alcohol-related harm is not
restricted to individual drinkers but has relevance for
families, bystanders and the broader community.

What are the harmful effects of Alcohol?
In low dose

EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL
In medium dose

In high dose

Relaxing effect

Reduces coordination

Vomiting

Reduces tension

Reduces concentration

Breathing difficulties

Lowers inhibition

Reduces reaction time

Unconsciousness

Slower reflexes

Slurred speech

Coma

Drowsiness

Death

Change in emotions
(anger, aggression)
Distorts visual and
hearing ability

Signs which indicate a person is drunk
or has consumed too much of alcohol
 mood changes

 raised speaking voice

 slurring or mistakes in speech

 falling down

 clumsiness, fumbling with
change

 dozing while sitting at a bar or
table

 loss of balance or coordination, swaying or
staggering

 crude behaviour

 confusion, lack of ability to
hear or respond

 inappropriate sexual advances

 bumping into, or knocking
over furniture

 inability to light a cigarette

 spilling drinks, or the inability
to find one's mouth with glass
 aggression or belligerence

Signs which indicate a person is affected
by illicit drugs


vomiting



teeth grinding



red eyes



sweating



dilated pupils



confusion

Alcohol and social problems
Alcohol not only affects an individual’s health but can also lead to –  family problems
 financial problems

 drink-driving which may lead
to fines, loss of licence and
even imprisonment

 legal problems

 work problems

 violent behaviour

 sexual problems

 risk-taking

 accidents

 offensive behaviour or acts
of vandalism

 deteriorating appearance

Duty of care/Harm Minimisation
It is the goal to provide service of alcohol in a way which has minimal impact on the financial and social costs of the
community and industry.
For reducing the harm of alcohol, licensees are encouraged
to ensure –

a. Adequate activities for advertising and promotion of alcohol are used
b. Use strategies promoting safe consumption of alcohol
c. Responsible hospitality services are offered at all times

a. Advertising and Promotions of
Alcohol
Promotional activities have to be managed and planned like any other business activity. Poorly managed promotion may be a
threat to safety of patrons and may also become disturbance of peace and good order of the neighbourhood.
Under the Alcohol Beverages Advertising Code, advertisements, including those on the Internet, in a retail context, or related to promotion of alcohol at events, must –

a. Not engage promotion or practice that may encourage the rapid or excessive consumption of liquor or promote intoxication, for example, happy hours, all you can drink, toss the boss, etc. b. Not have a strong appeal to children or adolescents

Continued..

a. Advertising and Promotions of
Alcohol
c. Not suggest that consumption can create change in mood or environment, or success of a personal, business, sporting or sexual kind
d. Not depict association between consumption (other than low strength alcohol) and use of motor vehicle, boat or aircraft

e. Not conduct any competition or game in which contestants or players consume liquor on the premises
f. Not give free or discounted liquor as a prize or for consumption on the premises, for example two for one, six drinks for a
certain price, etc.
g. Not encourage consumption that is inconsistent with the
Australian Alcohol Guidelines

b. Strategies promoting safe
consumption of alcohol
 Ensure free access to water for all patrons
 Making food available
 Avoid drinking games & limit offering complementary liquor or samples

 Provide breath analysis equipment for the use of customers  Display information about taxi and public transport services  Display information about harmful effect of over consumption of liquor

 Make low or non-alcohol drinks available at reasonable prices  Provide only standard drinks so that customer can assess their consumption correctly

 Display information about house policy clearly visible

c. Responsible Hospitality Services
 Adequate lighting
 Adequate security

 Having RSA trained staff
 Safe environment
 Supply food and water (free or at a reasonable cost)

How would you assist an intoxicated customer?
 Offer to arrange transport
 Offer to call a friend
 Ask a friend to assist the person home
 Ask security to escort the person to security

Refusing Service Of Alcohol
A responsible person or manager or licensee has rights to
refuse service for reasons unrelated to intoxication, for
example, violent behaviour, prostitution, hawking, drug or
illegal substance use.
As per legislation, the following patrons may not be sold or supplied alcohol:

 Minors
 Unduly intoxicated persons
 Disorderly patrons

Licensee must ensure that all the staff is aware of –
 Liquor Licensing Act relating to minors, disorderly or
intoxicated patrons

 Penalties which apply to person who supply, serve and
receive alcohol underage or intoxicated or disorderly
patron
 Procedures to check for proof of age
 Signs of intoxication and the potential for offensive or disorderly behaviour
 Procedures involved in removing minors, intoxicated or
disorderly patrons from licensed premises

What are the main reasons for refusal?
 The law requires it
 Safety of the patrons
 Safety of others
 Civil litigation

Servicing or supplying alcohol to minors
Minor is person who is under the age of 18. It is an offence to serve or supply alcohol to minors and if done so, the licensee, the responsible person and the person who sold or supplied the
alcohol are each guilty of an offence. Also, the minor in question is guilty of an offence and may face several fines.
It is an offence to:

 Sell or supply alcohol to a minor
 Allow a minor in an unauthorized area on licensed premises If a person is not able to present suitable ID, he or she must be refused to service and ensure they leave the premises
immediately. As per law, person with a fraud ID must be
prosecuted and the ID must be seized.

When is a minor permitted on a licensed premises?
In each of the following conditions minor is permitted on a
licensed premises –
 Accompanied by a responsible adult

 Lives on the premises
 Performing duties as employee at the premises

 Engaged in training for employment or work experience

Who is a responsible adult for a minor?
Each of the following persons is a responsible adult for a
minor –
a) A parent, step-parent or guardian of the minor
b) An adult who has parental rights and responsibilities for the minor.

ID Proof required
ID Proof can be a document that contains a photo of the person to whom it is issued and indicates by reference to the person’s date of birth or otherwise that the person has attained a
particular age.
The Liquor Act demands acceptable, photographic evidence of
proof of age, for example:
 An Australian government issued proof of age card (18+ card)  Current driver’s license or learner's permit with photo & date of birth
 A Victorian Keypass
 Current passport from any country

Continued..

What to do when customer presents a Fake ID?
If ID presented to you is fake or is a genuine ID being used by another person, you must ask for second ID.
If you believe the patron may be a minor and is unable to
produce another ID upon request you must confiscate his/her ID and give it to the manager or police.

What should staff look for when checking ID?
 Check if it is tampered
 If it is current
 Date of Birth
 Photo matches the person who presented it

Ordering alcohol online or over the phone or by
fax or mail?
 Person placing the order must be over 18 years of age
 Person taking order must ask information about the
purchases which includes – Date of Birth, Proof of Age and Address of Delivery
 The person receiving must show the photo ID and must be
over 18 years of age

Servicing or supplying alcohol to
intoxicated patrons
Unduly Intoxication means “a state of being in which a person’s mental and physical faculties are impaired because of
consumption of alcohol so as to diminish the person’s ability to think and act in a way which is ordinary prudent person in full possession of his or her faculties and using reasonable care, would act in like circumstances”.

It is licensee’s or staff’s responsibility to monitor a patron’s behaviour and level of intoxication and also to prevent the service of alcohol to an intoxicated person. Intoxication need not be necessary due to alcohol; it can be due to intake of some illicit drugs or medicines. Such people must be refused to service and ensure they either leave the premises or they are offered to buy some non-alcoholic beverage like soft drinks, tea or coffee.

Some obvious signs of undue intoxication
 Unbalanced

 Stumbling

 Rude

 Falling over

 Aggression

 Dropping things

 Slurred speech

 Raised voice

 Eyes not focussed

Servicing or supplying alcohol to disorderly
patrons
Disorderly patron refers to “anyone who causes a disturbance or behaves in a manner that discomforts other patrons, is
abusive, aggressive, offensive or demonstrates inappropriate behaviour”.
Licensee can also refuse servicing alcohol to disorderly
patrons because of harm or injury they could do to
themselves or other patrons.

A patron could be deemed disorderly when
he/she is –
 Aggressive
 Violent
 Argumentative

 Effecting patron’s comfort or temperament level i.e. upsetting other customers

Professional refusal of service
 Stop serving alcohol

 Offer non-alcoholic beverages

 Try to reason with the patron

 Offer a taxi

 Explain why you have to
stop serving

 Remove the patron off from
premises responsibly and safely

 Inform
colleagues
management

 Offer alternatives (like other
services available at the
premises – pool, karaoke etc.)

 Call security
 Offer food or water

and

Legislation
Alcohol is a classified as drug and thus government
legislation restricts on selling, providing and producing liquor. Every state or territory has a liquor licensing division which administers the Liquor Act, issues, checks licensee
applications, issue licenses and administers licensing
regulations.
In Queensland, we follow Liquor Act 1992 and Liquor
Regulation 2002. These legislations regulate the sale and
supply of liquor and the provision of adult entertainment.

Continued..

Legislation
The Liquor Act aims to ensure that –
 Alcohol is sold by responsible people

 Liquor outlets are located in appropriate locations (that do not disturb residents)
 Harmful effects of alcohol are minimised or avoided
It also restricts who can consume alcohol (e.g. young people or intoxicated patrons), the hours of trading and types of
businesses which can sell liquor.

Key Government Agencies
 OLGR (Office of liquor and Gaming Regulation)
 Clubs Queensland

Educational programs in QLD relating to Alcohol
 Prevention Program – Drug Arm
 Schoolies Safety Warnings and Signs – QLD Police
 Here for Life – RTA

 Young women and alcohol program – QLD Health

House Policy
House policy are the rules that are set by the
management of the licensed premises for venue to work
in. All house policies are venue specific, e.g.
 Some venues might not serve double shots
 Minors allowed at the premises
 Limit on the number of drinks a person can buy at a
time

Trading Hours
As per law, at licensed premises liquor can only be sold
during the ordinary or approved trading hours of the
premises. Every venue has different opening and closing
time for serving alcohol.

Security
When crowd controllers work at a public venue, a ‘crowd
controller incident register’ must be kept with details of controllers on duty and any incident that occurs.
OLGR or Fair Trading investigators and police can
inspect the register at any time.

Noise Level
A licensed venue have an obligation to manage the noise
levels of the venue, especially where noise and other
disturbances can be an issue to its surroundings.
It is the responsibility of all licensees and permittees to
ensure noise coming from their establishment does not
exceed the noise limit that is a condition of their licence. It is the responsibility of the licensee to make every effort to ensure the impact of entertainment, patrons and other
venue related noise does not negatively impact on local
residents and businesses.

Signage for premises

Conditions about training course certificates
Training obligations –
It is a condition of the licensee’s licence, licensee and
member of staff involved in the service or supply of liquor
at the premises must have a current training course
certificate.

Continued..

Conditions about training course certificates
Record keeping obligations –
Licensee needs to maintain a training register which
clearly states current training course certificates kept by
the licensee or matters relating to training persons
involved in the service or supply of liquor at the licensed
premises. Also licensee must keep a copy of training
certificate held by him/her and staff involved.

Advertisement of applications
As per law, an application for the following must be advertised in a way that ensures it is clearly visible to the passing public on each road frontage –
a. A licence or variation of a licence
b. An approval of a detached bottle shop

c. An extended trading hours approval or variation of an
extended trading hours approval
d. An adult entertainment permit, other than a one-off permit or subsequent permit
e. Another application that the commissioner requires, by
written notice to the applicant, to be advertised.

Things to Remember !!


Employer needs to keep a hard copy of RSA Certificate in
employee’s file.



Any breach of liquor licensing or responsible service of
alcohol laws, can result in penalties, fines and even a loss of license.



A standard drink is any drink that contains approximately 10 grams of alcohol. It is breach of legislation if a drink in excess of 10 grams is prepared or served at any licensed premises.



Not all glasses hold just 10 grams of alcohol.

Continued..

Things to Remember !!


If there is any doubt about the age of patron, the licensee or anyone who is responsible for the service of alcohol must
ask for proof of age.



It is dangerous to drive if the blood alcohol content is excess of 0.05%



Alcohol is not a stimulant, it is depressant. It first affects the area of the brain which regulates inhibitions, judgment and
self-control, thus causing the stimulated behavior.



‘Time’ and ‘NO alcohol’ are the only ways that can sober the effect of alcohol



More the alcohol consumed, the longer it will take for BAC to return to 0 (Zero).

Drinking and Driving
Under the national rules in Australia,
Drivers with open license must have less than 0.05 and
with learner’s license must have 0 (zero) as a percentage
of alcohol in their bloodstream when in charge of a motor
vehicle.

You have reached to the last bit of your course
With reference to your learning, answer the questions
based on 3(three) different scenarios.

Scenario 1 – Fake ID
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

The scene opens at a food store which also sells alcohol. A customer (seems like a teenage boy) places a pack of beer on the cash counter for getting it billed. Here is the conversation between store person and the customer: Store Person (smilingly): Hey! How are you today?

Customer: I’m good
Store Person (even before scanning the pack of beer): I’m going to get to see an ID please.
Customer (surprised): Okay
Customer takes out an ID from his pocket and hands it over to store person. Store person smells fishy about customer and looks onto his face to verify his identification.
Store Person: I’m sorry! This ID does not look valid. The numbers don’t line up and it’s rough on top
Customer: That is my real ID
Store Person (firmly): I’m sorry! I won’t be able to sell you alcohol. This is not a valid ID
Customer leaves the store without even asking for returning his ID.

Scenario 2 – Drinking too fast!
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

The scene opens at a bar, where two girls (customers) are gossiping, giggling and having their drinks at the bar counter.
Here is the conversation between bar tender and the two girls: Bar Tender: Would you girls like another drink?
Girl 1: We would like another one and while you get that, can you get us a couple of shots too
Bar Tender: Alright! What would you like?
Girl 2: I want a shot of vodka
Bar tender prepares and serves shots to the girls. Girls discuss amongst themselves to have more shots.
Girl 2: Hey, can we get a couple more drinks and maybe a couple of more shots please? Bar Tender: Alright! Would you like to try some pool or darts or something? Girl 1: Sure, you guys have a pool table

Bar Tender: Ya, we have got a pool table, its right back there. May be I can bring you some food, maybe a glass of water
Girls decide amongst themselves to have some cheese balls and orders for it. Bar Tender: Alright! I will bring your drinks back there and your water Girls move out of the scene towards the pool table.

Scenario 3 – Serving an Intoxicated Person!
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

The scene opens at a bar, where a man (probably in his late 60s) enters. His speech is slurred, loud and not clear. He then talks to another customer sitting at the bar counter and states that he has been drinking a long them and he can hold himself.

Customer: Hey!
Bar Tender: Hey, How are you doing tonight?
Customer (slurring speech and completely confused): Fine! I just thought I would come here by and have a drink here and one for the road Bar Tender: What can I get you?
Customer: How about a Budweiser!
Bar Tender: I’m sorry Sir, I don’t think I will be able to serve you tonight. It seems like you have had a lot to drink. In order for you to get home safely, I’m not going to be able to serve you.

Customer (gets annoyed and furious): Oh! Well, There are lot another bars in neighborhood, I can go there.
Bar Tender: Go ahead and try.
Customer leaves the bar.

SITHGAM201
Provide Responsible Gambling Services

By the end of this program you will be able to –
 Provide responsible service of gambling
 Provide information and assistance to customers
about problem gambling

What is Gambling?
It is a situation where money is staked on an uncertain
outcome. It is gamble when –


Buying a ticket in a raffle



Playing on slot machine



Buying lotto tickets



Buying scratch-Its tickets



Playing bingo



Participating in quiz on radio



Playing in casino



Betting on match



Playing pokies

Facts!
Australians spend approx. –


11 billion dollar per year on gambling



40% are said to participate in gambling regularly



1% of the Australian population have a severe
gambling problem

Gambling, Gaming and Wagering
Gambling – is the very broadest term. It refers to all situations where money is staked on an uncertain (chance) outcome, so
it includes both gaming and wagering
Gaming – refers to all forms of gambling except wagering i.e. it includes all legal forms of gambling other than racing and sports betting, such as lotteries, poker and gaming machines, casino gaming, football pools, interactive gaming and minor

gaming (raffles, bingo, lucky envelopes etc.)

Wagering – refers to bets placed with totalisators or bookies on races, sports or other events (e.g. horse racing, greyhound racing, rugby league games)

History of Gambling
Year
1809-10

1861
1920-21
1975-76
1981-82
1984-85
1985-86

Event
First organised race meeting in Australia
(New South Wales)
First Melbourne Cup run in Victoria
Golden Casket lotteries established in
Queensland as the first government-run
lottery in Australia
Pools introduced in Queensland
Lotto introduced in Queensland
Instant lotteries introduced in Queensland
First casino opened in Queensland
Continued...

History of Gambling
Year
1990-91
1991-92
1995-96
1997-98

1999-00
2002
2012

Event
Minor gaming introduced in Queensland
Gaming machines introduced in Queensland
Sports betting introduced in Queensland
Keno introduced in Queensland
Interactive
gambling
introduced
in
Queensland
Launch
of
Queensland
Responsible
Gambling Code of Practice
Australian Federal Government passes
legislation for gambling reform

Why do people gamble?


They hope to win money



They believe in personal luck



To get back the money they have lost



They like the atmosphere and excitement of gambling venues



For the social aspects (company)



They want to ‘defy the odds’



They find it as a way to escape their everyday lives (e.g.
depression, stress, isolation, boredom)

Potential benefits of Gambling
Some of the beneficial aspects of gambling are –


Entertainment



Charity



Tourism



Supporting community projects



Employment



Leisure



Tax revenue



Win money

In Queensland, a gambling product is illegal unless it is regulated by one of the seven Gambling Acts. The Queensland responsible
gambling strategy is used as the framework to develop and deliver responsible gambling initiatives.

What is Problem Gambling?
Problem gambling is characterised by difficulties in limiting money and/or time spent on gambling which leads to
adverse consequences for the gambler, others, or for the
community.
Or, we can also say, Problem Gambling occurs when
gambling causes problems for the individual, their families or friends or social network or for the broader community.

Ripple Effect Theory
According to the Ripple Effect Theory, the behaviour of a problem gambler may potentially impact another five to ten other people in their family/social circles.

Gambling

Individual
Family & Friends
Work
Finance/Economy
Community

What is Responsible Gambling?
Problem gambling is characterised by difficulties in limiting money and/or time spent on gambling which leads to
adverse consequences for the gambler, others, or for the
community.

Or, we can also say, Problem Gambling occurs when
gambling causes problems for the individual, their families or friends or social network or for the broader community.

Responsible Gambler
Responsible gambler is the one who –


Is in control



Doesn’t take gambling too seriously



Sees gambling as entertainment not a job



Only gambles with money set aside for entertainment,
never with the money for rent or food



Never borrows money to gamble from friends, money set
aside for other things or credit cards
Continued...

Responsible Gambler


Sets limit on the amount of time and money they will spend



Stick to these limits and walks away when they are reached



Recognises that you can’t win in the long run and doesn’t try to chase a win



Is relaxed and sociable



Is aware of family and friends



Is happy to take frequent breaks

Concerns with problem Gambling
Government
 Job loss

Individual
 Depression



Increased crime



Suicide



Increased need for
police



Stress



Financial problems

Increased demand
for government
funded services



Legal problems



Work or study
problems



Community
 Costs of criminal
behaviour

Family and friends
 Domestic violence


Stress



Increased crime



Neglected family



Social problems
due to financial
loss



Loss of income



Relationship
breakdown



Negative impact on
families



Adverse effects
upon gambling
venue staff



Increased demand
of social and legal
services

Economic cost of problem gambling


Cost of crime



Increased welfare demand



Cost of regulation



Financial strain on families

Government agencies that regulate the gambling
industry


QLD Police



OLGR (Office of Liquor and Gaming Regulation)

Gambling in Queensland
In Queensland, a gambling product is illegal unless it is
regulated by one of the following seven Gambling Acts –



Gambling Machine Act 1991 - regulate the use of 'Pokies' electronic gaming machines (EGM's), specifically those in clubs, pubs and hotels.



Keno Act 1996 – Keno game played in casinos, hotels and
pubs



Casino Control Act 1982 - regulates Casinos who are
licensed to operate traditional casino table games and
electronic gaming machines
Continued...

Gambling in Queensland


Lotteries Act 1997 – governs suppliers of Lottery games



Racing Act 2002 Wagering Act 2002 - (regulates the racing
industry e.g. horses, greyhounds)



Charitable and Non-Profit Gaming Act 1999 - game to raise
funds for a charity or non-profit organisation



Interactive Gambling (Player Protection) Act 1998 - ensures
the State and community as a whole benefit from interactive
gambling.

Queensland Responsible Gambling Strategy
It is used as the framework to develop and deliver
responsible gambling initiatives. It addresses the impacts of problem gambling on individuals, families and communities
and has a focus on preventing problem gambling arising, as
well as on developing treatment and support options.

Queensland Responsible Gambling Code of Practice
The purpose of the code of practice is to create a responsible gambling environment to minimise harm to gamblers, their families and the community.
The Code of Practice aims to achieve the following outcomes: 

Individuals, communities, the gambling industry and the
Government have a shared understanding of responsible gambling practices.



Individuals, communities, the gambling industry and the
Government have an understanding of their rights and
responsibilities in relation to responsible gambling practices. Continued...

Queensland Responsible Gambling Code of Practice


The gambling industry provides safe and supportive environments for the delivery of gambling products and services.



Customers make informed decisions about their gambling practices.



Harm from gambling to individuals and the broader community is minimised.



People adversely affected by gambling have access to timely and appropriate assistance and information.



The gambling industry considers, and applies, principles of responsible gambling to all new and emerging technologies.

Current Legislation
Queensland Responsible Gambling Code of Practice. There
are six practices in the code of practice –
1. Provision of information – to enable customers to
make informed decisions about their gambling
Signage must be displayed in following areas –


ATM machines



Gaming machines
Continued...

Current Legislation
2. Interaction with customers and community –
effective mechanism to link with local gambling related
support services and community networks
Every venue nominates a Customer Liaison Officer
(CLO) who provides appropriate information to assist
patrons and staff with gambling-related problems

Continued...

Current Legislation
3. Exclusion provisions – self-exclusion and venue-initiated exclusion procedures
It includes provisions like –


Providing contact information for support services



Customers to be removed from promotional materials list



Providing support in seeking exclusion from other
gambling providers

Continued...

Current Legislation
4. Physical environment – in the gaming area, making the
players aware of the passage of time, and not allowing
minors and intoxicated patrons. It also includes –



Providing responsible service of alcohol



Encouraging breaks in play



Gratuities not to be encouraged by staff



Customers to be discouraged from participating in
extended, intensive and repetitive play



Display of clock and natural lights

Continued...

Current Legislation
5. Financial transactions – procedures for the cashing of
cheques and payment of winnings, not offering betting
on credit, and not locating ATM facilities in close
proximity to gambling areas.

Continued...

Current Legislation
6. Advertising and promotions – devising advertising and
promotions with due consideration given to the potential
impact on people adversely affected by gambling.
Advertisements must comply with Advertising Code of
Ethics. The advertising and promotions must NOT –



Be false



Be misleading



Link gambling and alcohol



Focus solely on gambling



Offend community standards

Queensland Responsible Gambling Resource
Manual
The Queensland responsible gambling resource manual has
been developed to provide a step by step guide to the
implementation of code of practice. For every industry sector (e.g. hotel, casino, TAB outlets, racing, lotteries etc),
separate resource manual is developed which is available at
each venue at all times.

Queensland’s Gambling Help Service System
To support problem gamblers, their families and friends, the Queensland Government provides following services free of charge – 

Funds full-time face-to-face Gambling Help Services in 14 centres throughout the State



Runs Gambling Help Line (1800 858 858) which provides a free and confidential 24-hour telephone counselling and referral
service to people experiencing problems related to gambling



Runs Gambling Help online (www.gamblinghelponline.org.au)
which provides live counselling, email support and self-help

Gambling Help Line 1800 858 858

Gambling Help Online www.gamblinghelponline.org.au
Contact details — Queensland Gambling Help Services

Service name

Provided by

Local Phone

1. Gambling Help Brisbane

Relationships Australia

(07) 3423 6950

2. Gambling Help Logan

Relationships Australia

(07) 3808 9235

3. Gambling Help Gold Coast

Relationships Australia

(07) 5575 6122

4. Gambling Help Ipswich

Relationships Australia

(07) 3281 8677

5. Gambling Help Toowoomba & South West

Lifeline Darling Downs & South West Old

(07) 4632 2615

6. Gambling Help Caboolture & Redcliffe Peninsula

Alcohol & Drug Foundation (Interlock)

(07) 5428 6244

7. Gambling Help Sunshine Coast

Relationships Australia

(07)5492 7255

8. Gambling Help Wide Bay & Burnett Bundaberg

Lifeline Community Care — Fraser District

9. Gambling Help Longreach

Relationships Australia

(07) 4658 1855

10. Gambling Help Rockhampton & Central Queensland

Relationships Australia

(07) 4926 9377

11. Gambling Help Mackay & Whitsunday

Relationships Australia

(07) 4957 4542

12. Gambling Help Townsville

Centacare Townsville

(07) 4772 9000

13. Gambling Help Cairns

Lifeline Cairns Region

(07) 4050 4955

14. Gambling Help Mt Isa

Centacare Townsville

(07) 4743 4449

(07) 4191 3100/ (07) 4153 8400

Residential Treatment Service
Moonyah Rehabilitation Service

Salvation Army

(07) 3369 0922

Provision of Information
Providing information to patrons
Guidelines for good customer service includes –



Take the time to clarify precisely the information the patron is requesting (don’t assume)



Always respond to requests for information with respect and
refer the request to an appropriate person (e.g. Customer
Liaison Officer(CLO), Supervisor or Manager), if you are not able to answer it



Wherever possible, before referring an issue to the CLO, try to explain to the patron your reason for doing so and obtain their permission
Continued...

Provision of Information
Providing information to patrons
Guidelines for good customer service includes –



Ensure the information provided is accurate and complete (don’t guess or provide partial information)



Ensure the information is provided to the patron in a timely manner (as quickly as possible)



Always treat patron requests for information (e.g. about
Gambling Help Services) in a confidential manner i.e. respect the privacy of every patron. Only discuss a patron’s request for information with the appropriate people

Types of information/making information available to patrons Type of information General purpose of information

Display and/or provision of information

Responsible Gambling Venue’s written policy on their
Mission Statement
commitment to providing responsible
assistance to problem gambling
Responsible Gambling Information on how venue addresses the
Policy Document
problem gambling issue in the local
community
Responsible Gambling Information about potential risks of
Signs in venues (risk of gambling and where to get help for
problem gambling and problem gambling, e.g., Gambling Help
where to get help)
Line or local Gambling Help support service
Nature of games and Information (in an easy-to understand
game rules
format) that explains to patrons how the
various gambling products are played
Odds of winning or
Information (in an easy-to-understand
returns to player
format) that explains to patrons the odds
of winning major prizes.

To be clearly displayed in venue

To be available to patrons on request, and a
notice advising patrons that it is available
to be clearly displayed in the venue
To be prominently displayed in gambling
area and near ATM and EFTPOS facilities;
also to be available to patrons on request
To be available to patrons on request and
to be included in the Player Information
Guide (availability to be clearly displayed)
To be prominently displayed in gambling
area near relevant products (games); and
to be included in the Player Information
Guide (availability to be clearly displayed)

Types of information/making information available to patrons Type of information General purpose of information Display and/or provision of information Exclusion
mechanisms

Information that explains the
process of excluding patrons at
avenue (e.g., self-exclusions and
venue-initiated exclusions).
Complaint resolution Information on how a patron can
mechanisms
lodge a gambling related
complaint at the venue and how
it will be resolved.
Financial transaction Key elements of the venue’s
policy
financial transactions policy.
Other information
(e.g., legislative
requirements)

Example: “Rules Ancillary to
Gaming” in gaming machine
venues

To be available to patrons on request; and to be
included in the Player Information Guide (availability
to be clearly displayed)
To be available to patrons on request; and to be
included in the Player Information Guide (availability
to be clearly displayed).
To be available to patrons on request; and to be
included in the Player Information Guide (availability
to be clearly displayed)
To be prominently displayed in a conspicuous
position and in a way that ensures rules are clearly
legible from a reasonable distance in each gaming
area on the licensed premises.

Continued...

Odds of winning
Every venue must be able to provide player with the odds of winning of common forms of gambling activities. It is very important to understand, for every gambling activity the odds of winning differs, but it always favours the house.

Odds of winning 1st division in Gold Lotto (1 game)

1 in 8,145,060

Odds of winning top prize on a Poker Machine (playing
1 in 7,000,000
maximum lines)

Odds of winning 1st division in Powerball (1 game)

1 in 54,979,155

Odds of picking the trifecta in a 13 Horse Race

1 in 1,716

Odds of winning the 10 number jackpot on Keno (1 game) 1 in 8,911,711

Responding to request for information
When sensitive matter is referred to another person, reason
must be explained to the patron for doing so and his or her
consent/agreement must be obtained. Patron must be
assured that their identity would not be disclosed to this
other person (i.e., matter can be referred for advice without naming the patron involved). By consulting in this way
patron establishes the fact that his or her privacy is being respected and trust is built.

Continued...

Responding to request for information
When a patron is reluctant to grant permission to refer a very sensitive request to another person (even though reason/s for doing so have been outlined) then staff member must do either of the following –



outline the role performed by the venue’s CLO, explaining that the CLO is appropriately trained to handle such matters;



outline the advantages of the patron approaching the CLO
themselves; or



referring the matter for guidance anyway (preserving the
patron’s anonymity), when there are reasonable grounds to
believe the patron’s wellbeing could be in imminent danger

Customer Liaison Officer (CLO)
A Customer Liaison Officer is nominated by a venue to
undertake three key responsibilities –


Provide appropriate information to assist patrons with
gambling related problems



Support staff in providing assistance to those patrons



Provide assistance to staff with gambling related
problems

Task and responsibilities performed by CLO
where exclusions are concerned


Ensuring the patron is fully advised on the exclusion details and process



Issuing the patron with the relevant Exclusion Notice and
Order or Direction



Ensuring local Gambling Help service details are provided
to the excluded patron



Ensuring the assistance of the local Gambling Help service
is sought
Continued...

Task and responsibilities performed by CLO
where exclusions are concerned


Ensuring the patron is supported in seeking self-exclusion from other gambling providers



Ensuring the exclusion is documented, maintaining a Register of Excluded Persons



Ensuring promotional materials are not sent to an excluded patron



Ensuring all excluded patrons are treated with respect, dignity and privacy



Provide assistance to staff with gambling related problems

Advantages to a venue establishing links with its
local gambling help service provider


Assisting when a patron brings attention to a gambling problem



Assisting when a patron wants to be excluded from a gambling venue



Providing assistance when a patron wants to be excluded from other venues



Assisting when patron’s problem is affecting him/her or family members



Assisting venue staff to learn more about the services provided



Assisting when a co-worker has a gambling problem or suffers as a result of working in gambling venue

How can you establishing links with its local
gambling help service provider?


Through telephone



Provide the contact details of the venue to the local
gambling help service provider



Organise a meeting to discuss the services the local
gambling help service provider can provide to the
venue’s patrons and staff

Customer complaint resolution procedures
According to Code of Practice, venues must establish and
actively promote customer complaint resolution procedures. It includes –

1. Clarifying the complaint


Treat complaint of every patron with respect



Carefully clarify each complaint. Gather complete details
in a polite and sincere manner



Seek advice or guidance from other staff, as required,
but observe patron’s privacy rights
Continued...

Customer complaint resolution procedures
2. Resolving the complaint


Resolve the complaint in a timely and polite manner
yourself, where possible



Refer the complaint to a senior staff member for
resolution and referral to external parties

3. Advising the patrons of the complaint resolution outcome


Advise the patron of the outcome in all cases, in a
timely and courteous manner



Explain the reasons for outcome, as appropriate
Continued...

Customer complaint resolution procedures
4. Advising the complaint of available avenues of redress


Advise the patron of all available avenues of redress
or appeal (especially if a patron is not satisfied with
the venue’s resolution)



Provide the patron with appropriate OLGR contact
details

5. Recording the complaint


Record every gambling related complaint and the
corresponding actions taken in a register of complaint
and actions

Possible signs of problem gambling
Some of the signs of problem gambling are –
Signs

Examples

Faulty
Player reports having a perception of chances of winning
recognition
which is apparently unrealistic
Loss of control Player reports –




having a problem with gambling
having tried unsuccessfully to stop gambling
spending too much time gambling

Player is observed –




threatening or causing physical harm to others or self
selling valuables to gamble
behaving in an aggressive manner towards property
Continued...

Possible signs of problem gambling
Signs
Negative
impacts of
gambling

Use of alcohol
or drugs while
gambling

Examples
Player reports –
 having lost a significant relationship due to gambling
 having lied to others to hide their gambling
 having lost a job due to gambling
Third party (e.g., a family member or another patron)
reports –
 the patron is gambling instead of fulfilling family
responsibilities(e.g. picking children up after school)
 trying to borrow or “scam” money for gambling from
others (e.g. other patrons)
Player is observed as being unduly intoxicated or under the
influence of drugs while gambling
Continued...

Possible signs of problem gambling
Signs
Depression or
thoughts of suicide
Involvement in
multiple simultaneous
gambling activities
Personal remorse

Examples
Player reports they are suffering from depression
and/or have thoughts suicide due to gambling
Player is observed to be participating in three or more
gambling activities simultaneously (e.g. playing three
or more gaming machines at a time)
Player reports –






losing household money on gambling (e.g. money
that was to be used to buy groceries, pay the
rent, or pay rates or electricity bill)
selling valuables to gamble
borrowing money to live due to gambling
being unable to meet loan repayments due to
gambling

Making staff aware of patron’s problem gambling
Staff can be made aware of patron’s problem with gambling by either of the following –


Patron requests to be excluded from the venue



Family member or close friend of the patron request the staff of the venue indicating the patron’s problem with gambling



Staff member observes or reports patron’s gambling problem

Exclusion provisions
“Excluding a patron” means prohibiting a person from specific gambling products, services or the gambling areas of a particular gambling venue. In other words, a patron may be “excluded” (banned) from playing particular gambling products at the venue or from entering all or part of your venue.

There are two types of exclusions –
1. Self-exclusion
2. Venue-initiated exclusions
Continued...

Exclusion provisions
Self-exclusion
Step 1 Patron requests to be
excluded. Patron
provided with Gambling
Help Service information
Step 2 CLO outline selfexclusion process to
patron
Step 3 CLO issues patron with
Exclusion Notice to
complete

Venue-initiated Exclusion
Venue becomes aware of issue (e.g.
advised by third party or perhaps
staff members). Venue may decide to
exclude. CLO to document decision
and reasons for the decisions
CLO outline self-exclusion process to
patron. Patron to consider requesting
a self-exclusion. Patron provided with
Gambling Help Service information
Active monitoring process of patron
at venue. Venue decides to issue a
venue initiated exclusion
Continued...

Exclusion provisions
Self-exclusion
Step 4 CLO issues patron with
Exclusion Order. Patron has
24-hour cooling off period
Step 5 Exclusion comes into effect.
CLO to document this fact on
the Register of Excluded
Persons
Step 6 Exclusion enforced until it is
revoked (only after 1 year
after the exclusion
commenced) or it lapses
(after 5 years)

Venue-initiated Exclusion
CLO issues patron with
Exclusion Direction
Exclusion comes into effect.
CLO to document this fact on
the Register of Excluded
Persons
Exclusion enforced until it is
revoked (only after 1 year
after the exclusion
commenced) or it lapses
(after 5 years)

When an exclusion lapses or is revoked
Time frame

Explanation

24-hour cooling
off period

Applies only to self-exclusions. If a patron changes their
mind within 24 hours of Exclusion Order being issued then
a Revocation Notice – Self-exclusion is to be completed
and submitted to the venue within the 24-hour time limit.

If no application to revoke the exclusion is received then
5 years
maximum period any exclusion stays in place for a maximum of 5 years then it automatically lapses (expires).
Once exclusion takes effect, the excluded patron must
12 month
minimum period wait a minimum of 1 year (12 months) before applying for their exclusion to be revoked (lifted).
Continued...

When an exclusion lapses or is revoked
Time frame

Explanation

1 revocation
After the 1 year (1months) minimum period, the excluded
application per year patron can apply to revoke their exclusion – but a patron may submit only one Revocation Notice or Application per year,
starting at the first year anniversary of the Order or Direction. 28 days for venue
to act upon
Revocation Notice –
Self-exclusion

Where a patron applies to have self-exclusion revoked, the
venue must act upon that Revocation Notice – Self-exclusion within 28 days or the exclusion automatically lapses after this 28-day period.

28 days for venue
to act upon Venueinitiated Exclusion
Revocation Notice

Where the excluded patron applies to have Venue-initiated
Exclusion revoked, the venue must provide the patron with a
Revocation Notice & Conditions of Re-entry within 28 days or the Exclusion Direction remains in place.

Legislative and Code of Practice provisions in
relation to excluding patrons
In May 2005 legislation came into effect outlining the
responsibilities of all gambling providers with respect to
excluding patrons from their venues. Exclusion provisions are legally binding and financial penalties may be incurred for
breaches of these exclusion provisions. The legislation applied to all gambling industry sectors, except the Lotteries and the
Charitable and Non-Profit Gaming sectors. These two industry sectors are not bound by the exclusion legislation, however
certain practices in the Code of Practice do apply to these two industry sectors.

How to assist the patron
To assist the patron, staff member can –


Take the person to a quiet/ private area (offer coffee and a chat)



Offer literature on gambling



Discuss self-exclusion



Offer self-exclusion information



Ask a senior staff member for assistance if he/she is
uncomfortable

Physical Environment
Some of the features that create safe and supportive gambling environments are –



Minors are prohibited from gambling. In Queensland, minors
are only permitted to play





Bingo (unless alcohol or a gambling product forms part of
a prize
Lucky envelope games (unless alcohol or a gambling
product included as a prize and/or the ticket is of the
Scratch-it type)

Minors are prohibited from designated gambling areas.
Continued...

Physical Environment


Provision of hospitality services in areas where gambling is provided is managed in such a way as to encourage
customers to take breaks in play e.g. service of tea and coffee.



Child play areas/care



Where child play areas are provided, best efforts should be
made to minimise exposure to areas where gambling
activities are conducted.



Where gambling providers offer adjunct child care, these
facilities must provide safe and suitable standards of care
in accordance with relevant child care legislation.
Continued...

Physical Environment


Customers who are unduly intoxicated are not permitted to
continue gambling.



Staffs working in gambling areas are not to encourage
gambling customers to give them gratuities (i.e. tips).



Gambling providers implement practices to ensure that
customers are made aware of the passage of time.



Gambling providers implement practices to ensure that
customers are discouraged from participating in extended,
intensive and repetitive play.

Financial Transactions
ATM Facilities


ATMs are not to be located in close proximity to designated
gambling areas, or in the entry to gambling areas, where safe and practicable.



ATMs should not allow patrons to access cash advances on
their credit card account (ATM should only allow access to
savings or cheque accounts).

Continued...

Financial Transactions
Cashing of cheques and payment of winnings


Gambling providers are to establish a limit above which all winnings are paid by cheque or electronic transfer.



Gambling winnings above the set limit are paid by cheque and are not cashed on the gambling provider’s premises until the next trading day or within 24 hours of the win.



The following cheques can be cashed only by prior arrangement: 

cheques not made payable to the venue



cheques not made payable to the person presenting the cheque



multiple cheques
Continued...

Financial Transactions
Credit betting (lending of money)


Gambling providers are not to provide credit or lend
money to anyone for the purpose of gambling.

Advertising and Promotions
The code of practice outlines following practices which ensure advertising and promotions are delivered in a responsible manner –


complies with the Advertiser Code of Ethics as adopted by the Australian Association of National Advertisers



is not false, misleading or deceptive



does not implicitly or explicitly misrepresent the probability of winning a prize



does not give the impression that gambling is a reasonable strategy for financial betterment



does not include misleading statements about odds, prizes or chances of winning



does not offend prevailing community standards

Continued...

Advertising and Promotions


does not focus exclusively on gambling, where there are other activities to promote



is not implicitly or explicitly directed at minors or vulnerable or disadvantaged groups



does not involve any external signs advising of winnings paid



does not involve any irresponsible trading practices by the gambling provider



does not promote the consumption of alcohol while engaged in the activity of gambling



has the consent of the person prior to publishing or causing to be published anything which identifies a person who has won a prize



where appropriate, responsible gambling messages are incorporated in advertising and promotion

Staff’s Responsibilities


Provide the patron with information about the role of your venue’s CLO



Provide the patron with information about the self-exclusion services that are available at the venue, in a supportive and respectful manner



Provide the patron with information about the local gambling help related services



Refer the patron to your CLO if they seem willing to discuss the matter with the CLO



Advise your CLO (or Manager/ Supervisor) of the patron’s situation at the earliest opportunity



Protect the patron’s identity (respect the patron’s right to privacy) at all times

Supervisor’s Responsibilities


Monitor and advise the manager of any issues that needs
action



Monitor staff



Support and assist staff



Provide assistance when training is required



Assist staff with complaint handling

Manager’s Responsibilities


Ensure required signage is displayed



Ensure information on gambling help services are available



Maintain records of training, self-exclusion and incidents



Ensure staff are trained and possess required skills



Review complaints & look for opportunities of improvement

Support Services
The following organisations offer support and counselling – 

Break Even



Gamblers Anonymous



Salvation Army



Life Line



Review complaints & look for opportunities of improvement

Record keeping related to incidents
In Queensland, records need to be maintained of gambling
related incidents. It includes –


Self-exclusion notice



Register of excluded patrons



Register of gaming related complaints



Revocation notice

Harm Minimization
Purpose – is to foster the implementation of responsible
gambling policies and procedures in the industry, which will minimise the negative impact of gambling on patrons, their
families and the community.

Continued...

Harm Minimization
Strategies



Restriction on promotion and advertising



Signage



ATM’s and EFTPOS not to be located in gambling area



Limit on cash payment



Provide information on winning chances



Providing tea and coffee



Providing information on risks of excessive gambling



Minimum age of gambling – 18 years



Self-exclusion



Placement of clocks

Signages

Signages

Conditions about training course certificates
Record keeping obligations –
Licensee needs to maintain a training register which
clearly states current training course certificates kept by
the licensee or matters relating to training persons
involved in the service of gambling at the licensed
premises. Also licensee must keep a copy of training
certificate held by him/her and staff involved.

RSG’s statement of competence must be updated
every 3 years from date of issue.

You have reached to the last bit of your course
With reference to your learning, answer the questions
based on the scenario.

Scenario - Training to a new staff member
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

Scene opens at a gambling area where a senior staff member is going through an overview of gambling practices to Lisa (new staff member). Here is the conversation between them Staff member: This is our new gaming area

Lisa: It’s nice
Staff member: There’s quite a lot you need to know about this area, We’re quiet strict on responsible gambling, we adhere to a Code of Practice, so I’ll run through some of it now with you just to get you started. We’ll organise some formal training for you, as soon we can.

Lisa: Ok

Staff member: We have to remind our customers that gambling is something which should be enjoyed, but for some people it can get out of hand. These signs should always be kept visible (pointing to one of the signage displayed in the gambling area) Lisa: I see

Continued...

Scenario - Training to a new staff member
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

Staff member: It might take you a while before you notice the signs of problem gambling. I still miss some of them, but we do our best. If you notice someone getting overly emotional around the machines, or spending too much time on them, let us know. We have a responsibility to exclude people, and sometimes they even ask us to exclude them. It means that we restrict them from using the gambling facilities and we make sure that we don’t tempt them by sending out promotional material enticing them to gamble. I’ll introduce you to Marie later, she’s our Customer Liaison Officer. She’s been trained to help them and us. Lisa: Do they ever get mad at you?

Staff member: Some do, but we have to what’s right for our patrons and comply with the Law. Don’t worry, if you notice something, just pass it on to Marie or myself. We won’t leave you in the lurch. We have to make sure that we don’t add to the problems or create new ones.

Lisa: How do I do that?
Continued...

Scenario - Training to a new staff member
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

Staff member: Things like, making sure the natural light is visible, the cards are stocked, and that the signs are clearly showing. And that clock should always be on the right time. Some people have no idea how long they have spent here. I heard in some places of people forgetting to pick their children up from school.

Lisa: That’s sad
Staff member: We know that people can get carried away with gambling, thinking that they can always win, we make sure our advertising isn’t misleading. I’ll give you a copy of the Advertising Promotions Guidelines for you to look at, at your own pace. Of course we make money out of gambling but they need to know they can’t always come out a winner. That’s why we have easy to understand information about the odds of winning available in the venue. We have to balance between them enjoying themselves and reducing the problems some people may encounter. We also have policies like, anyone on the gaming area cannot accept tips.

Continued...

Scenario - Training to a new staff member
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

Lisa: Really? Why not?
Staff member: I guess it’s… so we’re not actively encouraging them for our own gain. Some patrons may wonder why other patron has just given the staff some money - like they may have been told which machine is going to pay or something like that. Obviously, we don’t know, but some patrons may think that. Also, anyone intoxicated isn’t allowed to gamble. Someone would lose everything if they weren’t thinking straight

Lisa: I see
Staff member: No minors are allowed near the machines. In the dining area is OK, or in the children’s play room, but this area is off limits. You may need to explain that to some customers who bring their children in here. Most are Ok about it, but some can be a bit of a problem.

Lisa: I have noticed there’s no ATMs in here. Do people mind leaving their machines to get money?
Continued...

Scenario - Training to a new staff member
(Read the scenario below and answer the questions)

Staff member: The ATM isn’t I here on purpose, we encourage people to have a break from the machines, anyway. We do things like, only pay big winnings by cheque and that cheque can’t be cashed that day. We don’t give credit and especially for gambling, we don’t cash cheques. People are allowed to do whatever they like with their money, but we don’t cash in on them when they are not thinking straight, which can happen when they are having a losing streak and are desperate to win back their losses, or even if they’ve had a win, and they think they can win even more.

Lisa: (sighs) There’s a lot to learn
Staff member: You’ll be fine. It’s just a matter of common sense and doing the right thing. We’re all in this together.
Staff member and Lisa leaves the area so that Lisa gets introduced with Marie (CLO)

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