Royal Ideology in Ancient Israel

Powerful Essays
Royal Ideology in Ancient Israel

One of the main themes present in the rise of monarchy in Ancient Israel has to be the concept of royal ideology. Royal Ideology is the practice of believing that the king is considered to be at the same level of power as Yahweh, and vice versa. Throughout our studies of Ancient Israel there are many pieces of evidence to support this idea, and it had a great influence on the monarchal structure that developed throughout the time. Dealing with this subject matter, focusing on Wisdom is undoubtedly one of the prime methods of being able to interpret these Old Testament texts.

One of the clearest themes to emerge when dealing with royal ideology in Ancient Israel is the acknowledgment of the king as Yahweh's anointed one and the function of the king as one whom Yahweh willed to deliver Israel. A prime example of this would be King David, although with him, the scope was greatly enlarged. He was still anointed and chosen by the "men of Judah” (Sam. 2:4) and later by the "elders of Israel" (2 Sam. 5:3), but he also conquered Jerusalem and called it the "city of David" (2 Sam. 5:9); he had a capital city that he considered his personal property, not a part of any tribal allotment. The next important amplification of David's royal ideology was the transfer of the ark to Jerusalem (2 Sam.6:1-15); with this step the "city of David" was made co-extensive with Israel's cultic center.

Considered to be one of the most momentous steps in this expansion of royal ideology under David would be the prophecy of Nathan (2 Sam. 7). This text seems to exhibit many expansions from later hands, but it is still possible to discern the oldest layer of the tradition. The key concepts dealt with within the text were that Yahweh promised to "make a house" (i. e. a dynasty) for David and to establish his throne "for ever" (v. 16). A later expansion has added that David's descendants would be the recipients of a special parent-child relationship with Yahweh



Bibliography: Crenshaw, J. "Wisdom," Old Testament Form Criticism, ed. J. H. Hayes (San Antonio: Trinity Univ. Press, 1974) Johnson, A. R. Sacral Kingship in Ancient Israel (Car-diff: Univ. of Wales, 1955) Rad, G. Von. Wisdom in Israel (Nashville: Abingdon, 1972) Toy, C. H. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Proverbs (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1899) Holy Bible: The King James Version (Collins Bible, A Division of Harper Collins Publisher, 2006)

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Ancient Israel & Ancient Egypt Olivia Nail Osan American High School Although ancient Egypt and ancient Israel are geographically close to each other, their religions are near polar opposites, and this affected their individual cultures immensely. Ancient Israel’s religion was a conservative monotheistic faith. The Ancient Egyptian’s religion was an opulent, polytheistic belief system. These two were similar in many ways, such as, the women of their cultures held similar rights; yet they…

    • 865 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ideology is best defined as a system of ideas and beliefs that affect a person, group, or culture’s way of thinking. Ancient Greece was filled with different ideologies throughout the years; almost every polis with a different and unique set of values. Sparta had its strict militarism and aristocracy, suppressing people’s free thought. Athens had a mostly open, democratic, system, allowing more room for individual interpretations. And the empire of Alexander the Great that, despite having an absolute…

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    An Analysis of Egyptian Influence on Ancient Israel and its Ramifications On the surface, the contrasts between Egypt and Israel could not be clearer. For example, one is rooted in polytheism, while the other is anchored in monotheism. However, the same cannot be said for their comparable attributes. These comparisons are often overshadowed by the narratives cast by the Biblical accounts, as well as prominent authors throughout the course of history. While both cultures influenced each other, the…

    • 200 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    “Israel was not created in order to disappear- Israel will endure and flourish. It is the child of hope and the home of the brave. It can neither be broken by adversity nor demoralized by success. It carries the shield of democracy and it honors the sword of freedom”. These wise words from John F. Kennedy show how important Israel is to this world. This is an area rich in history, and it will always remain a vessel of God’s sovereignty. Therefore, the nation of Israel isn’t in the past, because…

    • 1428 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Ancient Israelites settled in the land of Canaan sometime between 1300 and 1200 BC. The Israelites traced their descents to the father of many nations called Abram, several centuries before, who had migrated to Canaan from Mesopotamia (Britton,2017). From the beginning of time God had to deal with sinful ways from his chosen generation. God was not pleased for he gave them all they wanted but yet they were still unrighteous. God has a heart for all those who chose to live according to how he…

    • 379 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Weapons and Warfare of Ancient Israel The book of Judges describes the period when the Israelites were settling into the Promised Land following the Exodus from Egypt. Because the conquest was not complete, warfare was frequent, and resulted in the hero stories preserved in Judges. These heroes were known as "judges", meaning, not people who decided court cases, but military leaders who delivered Israel from her enemies. What weapons did these heroes use, and what was their strategy in defeating…

    • 2352 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The life in Ancient Israel was based on covenants and spiritual loyalty to the god which led to the unequal leadership of a single person. Aristotle perceived such leadership as insufficient since he thrived on an idea of Polis, in other words, a perfect community of households in which all individuals had a purpose. Likewise, Aristotle considered the involvement and purpose of citizens to be detrimental for having a prosperous nation. However, the people of Ancient Israel were ignorant in terms…

    • 668 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Israel

    • 2112 Words
    • 9 Pages

    CREATION OF ISRAEL Definitions: zionism: ‘to create for the jewish people a home in palestine secured by the public law’ 1) a homeland state set up for jews, by jews 2) movement for the reestablishment and protection of a Jewish nation in what is now Israel. Established as political organisation 1897 by Theodor Herzl anti-semitism - a dislike of Jews (has been around since Christian times) ottoman empire - modern day Turkey holy land - modern day Israel and Palestine mandate - commission…

    • 2112 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Israel

    • 442 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Israel should be the land for the Palestinians despite the fact that it was the promise land for the Israelis. The Palestinians have set their communities and home and made their own nation on the land of Israel, therefore, it is not fair that the Israelis force the Palestinians off the land. Palestinians today are persecuted by the Israelis and have their homes on Israeli soil destroyed and land taken by the Israelis. Israel has no right to violate human rights, including maltreating the Palestinians…

    • 442 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Genetic Abnormalities in Ancient Egyptian Royal Families It seems that throughout history, the words royalty and incest have gone hand in hand. Familial interbreeding occurred throughout a significant number of royal lines, including the British, Hawaiian, and Japanese thrones. However, none of these families, nor any other royal family for that matter, can match the profound rate at which the Egyptians practiced incest. Ancient Egyptian royal marriages were almost exclusively restricted to…

    • 1658 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays