roselle

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Bulletin of Environment, Pharmacology and Life Sciences
Online ISSN 2277 – 1808
Bull. Environ. Pharmacol. Life Sci.; Volume 1 [6] May 2012: 48 - 54

Original Article

© All Rights Reserved Academy for Environment and Life Sciences, India
Website: www.bepls.com

Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in Sudan, Cultivation and Their
Uses
Bahaeldeen Babiker Mohamed1*, Abdelatif Ahmed Sulaiman2 and Abdelhafiz Adam Dahab3
1National

Centre for Research (NCR), Dept. of Crop Production and Biodiversity, Khartoum, Sudan.
*Corresponding author E-mail: bbrr.2009@gmail.com
2Agricultural Research Corporation (A.R.C), El Obeid Research Station, Sudan.
3National Centre for Research (NCR), Env. & Natural Resources Research Institute (ENRRI), Sudan.
ABSTRACT
More than 300 species of Hibiscus are grown over the world. It is an annual herbaceous shrub belonging to the family
Malvaceae. Sudan is considered as the country in which Roselle originated, particularly in the Kordofan and Darfur areas.
Roselle is known as karkade in the Sudan and other Arab countries. It is mainly grown for its fleshy calyx (sepals), which is the commercially valuable part of the plant. The color of the calyx plays an important role in determining the quality of karkade.
The plant has some medicinal uses; in Europe, it is used in food preparation in sauces, jams, juices, jellies, syrups and flavoring, and as coloring agent for food and drinks. This paper is a review of the applications and production of roselle plants, and points out that roselle is a promising crop for medicinal uses, which is an aspect that has not been widely studied to date.

INTRODUCTION
Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) belongs to the family Malvaceae, locally called “karkade”, is an important annual crop grown successfully in tropical and sub-tropical climates [1]. The commercially important part of the plant is the fleshy calyx (sepals) surrounding the fruit (capsules).
The whole plant can be used as



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