Roe Vs Wade Research Paper

Better Essays
Rebecca Isaac
12-17-14
American Government
Mr. Long
Roe v. Wade “Roe v. Wade ruled unconstitutional a state law that banned abortions except to save the life of the mother. The Court ruled that the states were forbidden from outlawing or regulating any aspect of abortion performed during the first trimester of pregnancy, could only enact abortion regulations reasonably related to maternal health in the second and third trimesters, and could enact abortion laws protecting the life of the fetus only in the third trimester. Even then, an exception had to be made to protect the life of the mother.” Abortion was illegal in the United States and as a result many women would do “black market abortions.” A black market abortion was done by an unlicensed physician; many women would also perform the abortion themselves. A couple states, such as California and Newyork began to legitimatize abortions. These states would perform abortions in a safe manner with no real ruling from the supreme courts. A woman named Norma McCorvey also known was “Jane Roe” was single and pregnant women from Texas. McCorvey wanted to have an abortion but this was illegal in Texas unless it was for a
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abortions each year.
*“Nearly 1 in 4 (22%) of pregnancies end in abortion
*50% of women now seeking abortion have had at least one previous abortion.
*The U.S. abortion rate is among the highest of developed countries.
*51% of abortions are performed on women less than 25 years of age.
*Approximately 1/3 of American women have had an abortion by age 45.”

In January it will mark the 41st year anniversary on the ruling of roe v. wade. Since the rules, approximately 55,772,015 abortions have been preformed. Women have destroyed the lives of almost 60 million unborn babies. Babies who will never see the life they were entitled too. Such a selfish act done to such a selfless little human being. “Even the smallest person can change the course of the future.” J.R.R.

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