Roe V. Wade

Good Essays
Abortion The U.S. Supreme Court declared abortion to be a “fundamental right” guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution in the 1973 abortion case Roe v. Wade (www.abortionprocon.org). This ruling was based on the Constitution giving “a guarantee of certain areas or zones of privacy,” and also “This right to privacy… is broad enough to encompass a woman’s decision whether or not to terminate her pregnancy.” The U.S. abortion debate has raged on ever since this decision, making it a huge religious, political, and moral issue. The pro-choice proponents claim that choosing abortion is a woman’s right which should not be confined by religious and governmental prerogatives. The pro-life opponents adhere to the notion that personhood begins at conception, …show more content…
Abortion recipients succumb to mental health problems less than women denied abortions. Religion, in general, is a falsehood according to many leftists. The pro-life movement believes Roe v. Wade should be overturned and the Supreme Court overreached when it made this decision. Women should accept responsibility for their actions and their own bodies. They also purport since life begins at conception, unborn fetuses are capable of feeling pain during abortion procedures. Psychological trauma is common among abortion recipients. Abortion is murder and, therefore, goes against the word of God (www.abortionprocon.org). These are just a few of the significant arguments made in the abortion debate. There are many others.
Persuasive Essay
The damaging repercussions of abortion on a woman and her loved ones are sinful, immoral and appalling. It is possible to refute every pro-choice claim in the abortion debate with sound logic. The Supreme Court ruling in Roe v. Wade has been countered by two Supreme Court Justices, Antonin Scalia, and William H. Rehnquist. Scalia considered the right to privacy defended in Roe v. Wade “utterly idiotic” and declared it should not be accepted as binding precedent
…show more content…
The Bible does not discern between an infant and a fetus, therefore. There are many scripture quotations from the Bible that are relevant to the topic of abortion, for example, Jeremiah 1:5. God is speaking to the young boy Jeremiah in this scripture. He speaks of knowing the boy before he was formed in the womb (www.saintaquinas.com/mortal_sin.html). It is clear we have a soul before conception has taken place in this scripture. God clearly values us as human beings at the time of conception. The implication is that we should also value fetuses as human beings with souls. The sixth commandment (Exodus 20:13) makes killing a sin. Abortion is murder since we are valued as human beings while we are still in the womb. Abortion is therefore not only a sin but a mortal sin. St. John differentiates between a venial sin and a mortal sin in John 5:16-17. All sin is an offense to God, however, some sins are graver than others. It is, for instance, a graver sin to murder someone than to lie to someone. A venial sin still offends God and should be avoided because if we continue to sin in this way it can lead to mortal sin. In this passage John tells us if we commit a venial sin to pray, essentially asking for forgiveness. Jesus warns us that we will not be allowed into the kingdom of heaven if we commit a mortal sin, we will burn. A mortal sin must meet three criteria:

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Roe V. Wade

    • 1178 Words
    • 3 Pages

    States had come about. Abortion was legalized. It was the Supreme Court case of Roe v. Wade that made us take a turn into this political issue. In this case Norma McCorvey who used the pseudonym ‘Jane Roe’, was an unmarried woman who wasn’t permitted to terminate her unborn child, for the Texas criminal abortion law made it impossible to perform an abortion unless it was putting the mother’s health in danger. Jane Roe was against doing it illegally so she fought to do it legally. In the court cases…

    • 1178 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Roe v. Wade

    • 1874 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Period 4 Civics and economics honors Roe v. Wade court case “No woman can call herself free who does not have control over her own body.” – Margaret Sanger. No issue in comparison to the women’s rights movement has aroused such passion, conflict, and controversy as much as the right to an abortion. Roe v. Wade is a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court on the issue of abortion that has prompted an across the nation debate that continues today about the extension of an abortion’s…

    • 1874 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Roe v Wade

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages

    in Roe vs. Wade that women had a right to terminate their pregnancy at any point during the first 24 weeks. Roe’s real name was Norma McCorvey, who by the time of her third pregnancy didn’t want to carry the baby to full-term. McCorvey didn’t have money to travel yet could she afford an abortion in the six states that were legal. McCorvey was seen as the best person to be a plaintiff by Linda Coffee and Sarah Weddington, who were both committed to advocacy for women. Coffee filed Roe vs. Wade in…

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Roe V Wade

    • 589 Words
    • 3 Pages

    process. Roe was a 21 year old pregnant girl who struggled through life. Was a 10thgrade drop out, abused, and raped as a teenager. She spent some time in behavior school, to get her life back together because she abused alcohol and drugs. Though she had a hard life no mater how many kids she conceived she never could have an abortion, but she felt that she should get one because she wasn’t healthy , and she only had a 10th grade education how would she be ready to take care a child. Roe also didn’t…

    • 589 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Roe V. Wade Case

    • 1136 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The March for Life Protest In 1973, Jane Roe filed a court case against Henry Wade in which she accused Wade of impregnating her by sexual assault (Glazer n. pag). During the case, the U.S. Supreme Court first argued that the Fourteenth Amendment does not mention abortion, but rather it guarantees a privilege to individual freedom under due process (“Supreme Court Rules on Roe V. Wade, The” par. 5). The state of Texas argued that it had convincing motivations to protect the life of an unborn child…

    • 1136 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Impact of Roe V. Wade

    • 1738 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Impact of Roe v. Wade Among the many landmark cases of the United States Supreme Court, Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), still is one of the most controversial and politically significant cases in U.S. Supreme Court history, greatly affecting political elections and decisions concerning women’s rights ever since. In 1970, a woman named Norma McCorvey, who had been fired from her for being pregnant; wished to terminate the pregnancy. But in the state of Texas abortions were illegal expect…

    • 1738 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Essay On Roe V. Wade

    • 1185 Words
    • 5 Pages

    14th amendment. The issue became controversial due to the Roe V. Wade case, and has since then been counter challenged by many groups. Governor Casey, of the Pennsylvania legislation, challenged the decision of the Supreme Court by passing the Pennsylvania Abortion Control Act of 1982. Many argued that both decisions were unconstitutional and violated the rights of women. The controversy of abortion has lasted till today, due to the Roe V. Wade case, the Pennsylvania Abortion Control Act of 1982, and…

    • 1185 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Roe V. Wade Analysis

    • 1415 Words
    • 6 Pages

    unconstitutional under Roe v. Wade, in which it was decided that abortion is a fundamental right protected by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The provisions challenged were the required informed consent, the 24 hour waiting period prior to the procedure, the requirement that a minor seeking an abortion must obtain consent, and the requirement that a married woman must indicate that she notified her husband of her intention to have an abortion. The District Court held that all of…

    • 1415 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Roe V. Wade History

    • 522 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Abstract On January 22, 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision in Roe v. Wade, it was enacted in order to make abortion services safer and more accessible to women throughout the country (Roe V. Wade: Its History and Impact). Prior to Roe v. Wade, abortion was illegal in almost all of the states unless it was to save a woman’s life, preserve her health, or in instances of rape, incest, or fetal anomaly. Prior to 1973 most women were not in the workforce and were not able to pursue education…

    • 522 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Roe V. Wade Summary

    • 363 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973) Facts: Texas had passed a law that made it illegal for women who were expecting to have an abortion, unless, pursuant to medical advice, given to save the life of the mother. Jane Roe was an unmarried, pregnant woman. She was unable to get a lawful abortion in Texas because her life was not endangered by going through with her pregnancy. A law existed in Georgia at that time also and was heard as a case relating to it. Issue: Whether or not a pregnant…

    • 363 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays