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Robert Penn Warren's 'Evening Hawk'

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Robert Penn Warren's 'Evening Hawk'
For years at a time history has been made every day. Associated with the constant changes of the influence way the world is run. The influence used with good intentions, yet may end in ultimate failure. As the world evolves one aims to better oneself to sustain living and maintaining life on earth. However, as humans we believe we can change how life evolves to fix ones mistakes but in fact are making them worse. Allowing such mistakes reoccur over and over again. Society is not paying attention to the mistakes created and not allowing correction. In realizing history’s repetitive and negative nature, Robert Penn Warren, wrote “Evening Hawk” in order to influence readers to learn from their mistakes.
By setting an image in one’s mind with one’s mind with sensory language, Warren is able to convey a sense of fear by illustrating the passage of time. “Evening Hawk” symbolizes the error of humanity. Hawks to most people are associated with strength because it is a powerful yet misunderstood bird. Line 2 “Geometries and orchids that the sunset build” implies that the sun has set and the hawk is taking flight. Continuing with Stanza 1 Line 10 “the crash less falls of stalks of time/gold of our error.” one may picture a
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With mood it creates meaning. For example, after re-reading the poem “Evening Hawk” means do not ignore ones mistakes, if one does, one will not become a better person. It demonstrates in the poem how there was a mistake that has taken place, aging comes in to play, and finally mistakes are being realized. Warren did this to open people eyes to mistakes and give them time to reevaluate how the mistake can be fixed. They were benefiting versus learning from the history. Line 18 “Now cruises in his sharp hieroglyphics his wisdom/ is ancient, too and immense.” Warren used this line to show how one can prosper from mistakes because you have gained wisdom and learned from the

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