Robert F. Kennedy's The American Wilderness: Why It Matters

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The piece of literature "The American Wilderness: Why It Matters" expresses Robert F Kennedy, Jr's concern about the American Wilderness. Within this piece of literature, Kennedy is addressing the general American public. This piece of literature was not meant for anyone but Americans. You can see this by the usage of his language. He continually talks about the "American" wilderness, the "American" culture, the "American" fill-in-the-blank. I could not see anyone that is not American nor connected with America in anyway having too much interest in this literature. Kenney comes right out and tells us who would disagree with him in the first few sentences in his quote, "opponents of wilderness protection". They would disagree for various reasons such as they are making money themselves to just simple disagreeance that the wilderness is something we need. However, he will have people who agree with him. These sort of people cannot be classified. You will of course have your environmentalist but you will also have the regular people who you would never have guessed would agree with this literature. He takes a very serious attitude toward the subject and audience. It …show more content…
Whether that is true or not is not the debate at hand.The crucial struggle within this literature Kenny portrays is the importance to save the remaining nature that defines our culture while still having a stable economy. According to Kennedy, while our ancestors have destroyed nature before we have been able to preserve certain areas due to past leaders who acknowledged nature as the basis of our culture. In Kennedy's opinion, Frederick Jackson Turner is the first great historian. Frederick Jackson Turner felt that the root of American democracy was grounded in the wilderness. MORE

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