Top-Rated Free Essay

Rise of the Indian Novel in Engish and the Rise of Individualism

Good Essays
Effects on Language
The Indians adopted the English language as their main form of communication and national language. The missionaries who went to India during the early colonial days introduced this language. In addition, most of the educated Indians preferred to communicate in English. This was to portray their civilization level and also help them catch up with the English ways, which they all pursued passionately. For example, we are told that some of them like Lola’s daughter, Pixie, have a British accent, which sanitized elegance and, therefore, worked for the BBC. Her mother tells her never to look back at India and live in Britain for good. This is a demonstration of how some of the Indians failed to appreciate their origin and customs. They chose to speak their colonizer’s language and discard and even undermine their original language. This can be seen as a form of modernization.
The use of English language continued for a long time and caused many traditional Indian language dialects to be abandoned and even forgotten. This is still prevalent even today. Indians still use English language as their national and official language.
Effects on Identity
The British colonizers initiated the loss of the Indian identity. This emerged from the way the undermined Indians’ culture, practices and beliefs. They overlooked them and put their own English ways into practice. This caused the Indian ways to fade, and the result was that many Indians preferred to identify themselves with the English ways.
There is a total loss of identity among many people, who prefer to follow the English way of life, while those who practiced the previous Indian ways were despised. This is seen, in characters, like the judge in several instances. For example, when the judge had gone to study abroad, we are told he became obsessed with bathing off his Indian smell. He wanted to separate and alienate himself from his original Indian ways. When he returned to India from studying, he totally despises his Indian wife whom he finds to be backward. We also see this from the house he lives in at Kalimpong. We are told that many other houses at Kalimpong were built in an English design. They preferred not to live in houses which were built in traditional Indian design. This demonstrated the desire to have a British identity.

Effects of Colonialism
Even after India attained independence, they still fought among themselves. This was all in an effort to do away with any oppression that they felt. For example, the Gorkha tribe continually fought for land and freedom. This was just a way of expressing themselves after the oppression that they had received for a long time being a British colony. The British introduced many things in India during their time there. This ranged from development to oppression of the Indians. The English missionaries introduced formal education, where the Indians were taught how to write, speak and read English language. There was also construction of roads and rails. This improved transportation in India, which enhanced trade. They also introduced improved agricultural practices in India. This increased agricultural output hence food availability and further expansion of agricultural trade. They also introduced improved technology and science that enhanced globalization in India. This led to growth of India’s economy and expansion of trade. These developments are still felt up to date, and, they have been used as a basis for further development. However, despite all these positive impacts, the Indians still felt oppressed as they were not allowed to rule in their own country. Instead, they were ruled by foreigners. After independence, the Gorkhas become violent to other Indian tribes that are a minority. This was because of the oppression that they suffered at the mercy of the British colonizers. They do this to relieve the tension and stress that they have suffered under the rule of the British Empire. This results to a political turmoil in India that scares the Indian citizens like the cook. When the cook talks to his son Biju, we see that the whole community thinks Biju can save them, because he is in America. They believe that being there gives one power. This gives Biju a burden for his father and his society and he thinks about going back home.
However, despite many desires people had to be civilized by following the ways of the British, we see firsthand experience in Biju’s life about the negative effects this might have. After living and working in America for some time, Biju realizes the emptiness that he felt on the inside. He realized that the new ways were more enslaving than he thought before. He is filled with betrayal for his family and guilt because of his actions. He preferred to go back home. He missed the old days of his childhood in India and realized that this was the life he wanted for himself and his children. He, therefore, decides to go back to India where his father lives. On the other hand, people like the judge, still believe that India is such a backward country and it would be better not to live there. He was rejected by his family for not being an Indian man.
Conclusion
In conclusion, we can see that the effects of the British colonial rule were continually felt in India for quite some time even after the colonizers left. This is observed from the way the Indians behave, their practices and beliefs. Most of them abandon their traditional way of life and struggle to copy the English ways as a way of civilization. This raises conflicts among themselves and tribal clashes arise. All these happen, because the Indians had no idea what their real identity was and strived to achieve it. The only way they thought to be worth to appropriate was through violence. This triggers a series of events as they strive to be independent.

RISE OF THE INDIAN NOVELS
The substantial rise of Indian writing in English and the novelistic tradition in the English language is a subject matter that had arrived much later, precisely just after the British Raj and consequent Indian Independence. Leaving out the rise of Hindu ruling dynasties during the ancient to late ancient period, the medieval period, to some extent had witnessed the development of novel and prose writing.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Topic 3 - Discuss the Rise of Individualism… The rise of individualism, at what we now know as the medieval era, opened the eyes of many people; a few will be discussed though out this paper. In the times previous to the establishment of individualism, man, as a whole considered him-self corrupt, impure and unworthy. Slowly, individuals began seeing certain things differently. As these free thinkers began to spread their ideas many mindsets began changing as well. Along with these mindsets ideas…

    • 1341 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Rise of the English Novel The dominant genre in world literature, the novel is actually a relatively young form of imaginative writing. Only about 250 years old in England—and embattled from the start—its rise to preeminence has been striking. After sparse beginnings in seventeenth-century England, novels grew exponentially in production by the eighteenth century and in the nineteenth century became the primary form of popular entertainment. Elizabethan literature provides a starting point…

    • 816 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Rise of the English Novel

    • 5123 Words
    • 21 Pages

    The Rise of the English Novel English literature has a long and colorful history. From the masterfully written old English tales of Chaucer to the countless Shakespearian dramas to the poetic verses of Tennyson, England has produced some of the richest treasures of the literary world. Not until the eighteenth century, however, did a type of literature develop that completely broke the traditions of the past and opened the door to a whole new generation of writers. This new genre was appropriately…

    • 5123 Words
    • 21 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Indian Price Rises

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages

    unemployment, the problem of illiteracy, the problem of population, so on and so forth. The problem of rising prices is one of the most important problems that Indian is facing now. This problem is two-fold to check the rising prices and, if possible, to bring the prices down. The economists are of opinion that growing economy of the country has given rise to the rising prices. Such economy causes inflation. In inflation purchasing power runs ahead of purchasable goods. In other words, in a growing country…

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Rise of English Novel

    • 2564 Words
    • 11 Pages

    ADVERTISEMENT FOR RECRUITMENT OF CONSTABLE(TRADESMEN)(MALE) IN BORDER SECURITY FORCE Applications are invited from MALE Indian citizens for the post of Constable (Tradesmen) in Border Security Force in the pay band –I Rs. 5200-20200 + Grade pay Rs.2000/- plus usual and admissible allowances to Central Govt. employees from time to time. In addition, Ration allowance, Medical Assistance, free uniform, free accommodation, free leave pass, etc. are admissible to BSF. 2. Application in the prescribed…

    • 2564 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Rise of the Novel in the Eighteenth Century ( A Brief Summary of the first three lectures) 1- The first half of the eighteenth century marks the rise of a new literary genre: works of prose called today ‘novels’. 2- The novel has its roots in the short tales of the middle and Elizabethan ages, like romances and other adventure stories. 3- Romances- also called “French romances”- are fictitious, fanciful stories in prose about knights and their…

    • 1945 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Monday, December 27, 2010 The Rise of the Novel in the Eighteenth Century Introduction: In the eighteenth century the years after the forties witnessed a wonderful efflorescence of a new literary genre which was soon to establish itself for all times to come as the dominant literary form. Of course, we are referring here to the English novel which was born with Richardson's Pamela and has been thriving since then. When Matthew Arnold used the epithets "excellent" and "indispensable" for the eighteenth…

    • 4170 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The rise of Indian software industry Question 1 To what extent the theory of Comparative advantage explain the rise of Indian software industry? Answer Theory of Comparative Advantage David Ricardo has developed theory of Comparative Advantage. Which was later developed by Heckscher-Olin. They all argued that all countries have different factor endowments of labour, land and capital inputs. Therefore, Countries should be able to specialise in and export products that they can efficiently produce…

    • 2323 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Rise

    • 1167 Words
    • 5 Pages

    in a city with such rich Caribbean culture. Mittelholzer Street obtained its name from a famous Guyanese novelist, Edgar Austin Mittelholzer. He was considered as the first professional novelist to come out of the English-speaking Caribbean. His novels include characters and situations from a variety of places within the Caribbean, and range in time from the early period of European settlement to the twentieth century. They feature a cross-section of ethnic groups and social classes, dealing with…

    • 1167 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    that eventually lead his characters into appalling situations, ultimately serves as an example of some sort of revelation or epiphany to the character. One example of O’Conner’s writing that depicts such theme is the short story, “Everything That Rises Must Converge,” which tells of the story of a recent college student, Julian escorting his mother to a weight-loss class. The two characters reveal contrasting and distinct viewpoints towards racial discrimination. In their encounter with a black mother…

    • 1300 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays