Rights Human Rights

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Topics: Human rights, Rights
1 Understand key legislation and agreed ways of working that support the fulfilment of rights and choices of individuals with dementia while minimising risk of harm
WORD MEANING RIGHTS Human rights; independence; respect; freedom to do what I want; to protect myself and my property; to be heard; to vote; to express my sexuality; right to an education/work. RISK Danger; part of life; unacceptable or acceptable; who’s risk? risky activities; risk of harm; injury; protection. CHOICE Independence; ‘my life’; variety of; priorities; making the right choice; making the wrong choice; what to eat; what to wear; relationships; place to live. HARM Danger; pain; intentional or unintentional; long lasting or short lasting; reputation; sense of identity/safety. ABUSE Physical; emotional; financial; sexual; neglect; law; vulnerable; prison; shocking. TRUST Friendship; feeling – safe, secure, positive; enabling; back up; care; love. Money in Trust DIGNITY Free from embarrassment; acknowledged as a human being; a way of being/carrying oneself; sense of self; lack of dignity – abuse, damage, pain, fear

1.1 Explain the impact of key legislation that relates to fulfilment of rights and choices and the minimising of risk of harm for an individual with dementia
Human Rights Act of 1998 - This Act became law on the 9th November 1998 and mostly came into force on 2 October 2000. Its aim is to support individuals through the
UK courts in some of the rights contained in the European Convention on Human Rights. In particular, the Act makes it unlawful for any public body to act in a way which is incompatible with the Convention, unless the wording of an Act of Parliament means they have no other choice.
The Human Rights Act also gives people the right to take court proceedings if they think that their Convention rights have been breached or are going to be.
Human rights include:
• the right to life
• the right to liberty and security of person
• the right to

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