Rhetorical Essay

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Advertisements are use across the world trying to persuade the customer to buy an item that they may or may not need. In the Old Spice advertisement, the picture gives us an idea that if we use their soap we are able to become like the man in the advertisement. An Old Spice advertisement tends to appeal to the male population who are self-cautious about themselves and wants to better them. In their advertisement, they use slippery slope and tell that the viewer could be like them if they buy their product. Throughout the centuries, people used ethos, pathos, and logos in order to persuade others to what they want to achieve. Many advertisements nowadays are trying appeal to a variety of different types of groups in order for the customers to buy their product. By viewing this advertisement carefully, you are able to see many different characteristic about who the advertisers are trying to appeal to and what they want the audience to get out of it. Every ad has an intended meaning for the customer so that they can relate to or something that can lure customer in. In this Old Spice commercial, the advertiser wants the male population to purchase their product by presenting an attractive male holding their product. On his body, it shows different types of sports and adrenaline fueled activity. These appeals to the athletes or people who want to become one. The advertiser wants the viewer to believe that if the viewer purchases their product they could also become just like the man in the photo. He is posing with the Old Spice shampoo and deodorants to show off that he uses it with confidence. They are sending out a message that if you buy their product you could be as attractive as the man in the photo. Also, people who are self-cautions about themselves are attracted to these ad. The confidence on the man’s face can imply that by using these shampoo and deodorant, you can also gain the confidence he has.
Most advertisement uses logical fallacies to

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