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Rhetorical Analysis:
President Ronald Reagan 's Farwell Address

Rhetorical Analysis: Reagan 's Farwell Address Ronald Reagan 's Farewell Address was an amazing example of conveying the fundamentals for freedom through an emotional and visual lesson. It is no wonder that the president known as the "great communicator" was successful in painting for us a picture of who we were, past and present, and the improvements in the areas of strength, security, and stability that this great nation, or as Reagan referred to in his speech of John Winthrop 's vision of it as a "city upon a hill", had achieved over the past eight years. This amazing example has even been considered one of the greatest speeches given by an American president. Tom Nugent, Executive Vice President and CIO of Victoria Capital Management, said in a recent article regarding Reagan 's Farewell Address, " I recommend that you access his address on the Internet where you can observe the greatest speech of any president during our lifetimes."1 The American people were able to identify with the message of this speech because of the humility of President Reagan. The setting was the Oval Office, to which many of our presidents before Reagan presented their farewell address as well. However, the tone in his voice as well as his demeanor, gave you the feeling you were having a one on one chat with an old friend. This setting really set the mood for a memorable experience that Josh Bollinger explains in his article like this, " Reagan was already a beloved President, and he began the speech nostalgically, which pulled his audience with him into an intimate atmosphere."2 The atmosphere really complimented the Ethos of this remarkable man. Although he refuted the claim of being a great communicator and answered by saying, "I communicated great things", his speech flowed with success, because he credited fellow Americans for the state of our nation.



Cited: Bollinger, Josh. "The Great Communicator" Analysis of Famous Speeches, http://j-bollinger-afs.blogspot.com/ (May 2012) Mercieca, Jennifer. "Ronald Reagan, Freedom Man" Encyclopedia Britannica Blog, http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2011/02/ronald-reagan-freedom-man/ (February 2011) Nugent, Tom. "US Should Take Notes From Reagan 's Farewell Address" Money News, http://www.moneynews.com/LarryKudlow/Nugent-Reagan-farewell-address/2012/11/12/id/463756 (November 2012) President Reagan 's Farewell Speech, YouTube (streaming video) accessed December 2, 2013, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKVsq2daR8Q Reagan, Ronald. "Farewell Address To The Nation" The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library, http://www.reaganfoundation.org/pdf/Farewell_Address_011189.pdf (January 1989) "Speeches and Debates of Ronald Reagan" Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speeches_and_debates_of_Ronald_Reagan (February 2013)

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