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Rhetorical Analysis Paper

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Rhetorical Analysis Paper
Tramy Quach
Professor Knapp
English 100A, Section 6
Final Draft
03/06/13
RHETORICAL ANALYSIS PAPER
Introduction
Rhetorical strategy is a type of method for writers to manipulate their writing to purpose an idea or influence the reader. Narration, description, and exemplification are some of the rhetorical appeals writer use to grab the reader’s attention. And invoke strong reaction out of the reader. Apart from these strategies, many writers use Aristotle's appeals of Logos, Ethos, and Pathos to persuade the reader. Logos is an appeal to the audience's logic and reason. Pathos is an appeal to the audience’s sentiments and emotions. Ethos is an appeal to the authority or reputation of the speaker. Logos is an appeal to the audience's logic and reason. In my rhetorical analysis, I will be analyzing an article by Heather Mattern called, “Learning to Breathe”. In this article, Mattern proposes increasing physical activity such as running, , consuming raw foods, and adopting a positive mentality to curb depression. Mattern’s article brings awareness to health educators, like myself, who focuses on the study of health related issues like food, nutrition, and prevention. Through the use of use pathos and logos appeals, as well as narration, classifying and diving, and exemplifications to do what?

Pathos Through her article, Mattern appeals to our emotions by using vivid descriptions of depression in order to get her reader to sympathize and gain awareness of how serious depression can affect our mood. In the article, Mattern uses pathos as an appeal to the reader when she explains, “I learned… about one in every eight women could expect to develop clinical depression during their lifetime. Many of these women I know. They are my friends, mothers popping anti-depressant pills and smiling numbly with an artificial happiness. They know no other way” (Mattern). Here, Mattern is successful in getting her readers to briefly acquire a visual sense of how depression

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