Rhetorical Analysis of the Essay ‘Our Wall’

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‘Our Wall’; written by Charles Bowden; is one of the essays focused on border problems, especially with the illegal immigrants and smuggling; and the wall to prevent the same. The author is an American non-fiction author, journalist, and essayist who mainly depicts the realism, and presents it to the society with the hope of change. In this essay, ‘Our Wall’, he cites the wall is made by U.S in order to control the illegal immigrants from Mexico. The essay collects views and comments before and after the establishment of wall of the people from both sides. This essay seems to be in against of the wall, which generally breaks up the personal ties and humanitarian relationship of the people in and out of the wall, and the wall stands still long way clearly showing the silent harsh voice of separation. That means we are not the same, we are of different country with different backgrounds. However some people are happy with the wall because they feel secured with the presence of the wall unlike before when illegal immigrants come and vandalize their house and take away their belongings. The essay gives the examples of the history too in against of the wall. The walls in the history, like Great Wall of China, Berlin Wall and Rabbit Fences of Australia are never succeed. These walls always try to prevent the people but can never prevent the will of the people. This essay is able to appeal its audiences with logic, authority, and emotion.

Using logic to create a sense of abhorrence towards the wall

The best part of this essay is the illustration of the history. The author links the wall with the walls made in past to prevent the people, but with the time, people break all those walls and spread the sense of togetherness. When writer says, “Most walls are for keeping people out. They all work for a while, until human appetites or sheer numbers overwhelm them” the sense of abhorrence seems quite obvious in the writer’s voice. Before the wall is made, there is

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