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Rhetorical Analysis Essay
Chloe Fu gate
Mr. Galante
English 11
02, December 2012
Research Paper on Domestic Abuse

On a typical day in the United States three women are murdered by their spouses or partners, and thousands are injured. Victims include teens who are abused by their parents as well as young parents who assault each other, or their children. Violence against women has been reported since the Ancient Roman times. Researchers are now finding that young people at the ages of 16-24 are at the most risk. Does domestic abuse have an effect on the children? Studies show that 3-4 million children between the ages of 3-17 are at risk of exposure to domestic violence each year. U.S. government statistics say that 95% of domestic violence cases involve women victims of male partners. The children of these women often witness the domestic violence. Children don’t just don’t know about the abuse they see it happen, hear it happen, observe the abuse, and are aware of the abuse. Children who are exposed to battering become fearful and anxious. They are always worried for themselves, their mother, and their siblings. Children from abusive homes can look fine to the outside world, but inside they are in terrible pain. The emotional responses of children who witness domestic violence may include fear, guilt, shame, sleep disturbances, and sadness etc. They may also use violence to express themselves. Children from violent homes have higher risks of alcohol/drug abuse, post-traumatic stress disorder, and juvenile delinquency. One of the most tragic outcomes of domestic violence is that well more than half of the young men between the ages of 11 and 22 who are in jail for homicide have killed their mother’s batterer. What type of effects does domestic abuse have toward the victim? Domestic violence physically, psychologically and socially affects women and their families. Survivors of abusive relationships will often suffer low self-esteem and feelings of worthlessness. Domestic

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