Residential Schools And Aboriginal Parenting: Article Analysis

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Jean Lafrance and Don Collins’ article titled, “Residential Schools and Aboriginal Parenting: Voices of Parents”, elaborates pellucidly “the effect that residential schools had on [aboriginal parents’] parenting”. It seems, according to the article, predominant that ‘[aboriginal children] were treated very badly right from the beginning.’ Lafrance and Collins suggest that the establishment of residential schools has deprived of aboriginal children’s own culture. In residential schools, aboriginal children cannot get any care from their parents. Essentially, they lose attachment - the most essential emotional tie - between their parents and them: they are not able to find anyone comfortable, familiar, or responsive. Specifically, Lafrance and

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