The American Revolution was a momentous moment in the history of the United States as it gave rise to various political groups with differing beliefs as to how to construct a stable government. The two major political factions, notably the Republicans and the Federalists, debated over a multitude of policies between 1801 and 1825 that ultimately shaped American society. The policies pursued by the Republican presidents, such as Thomas Jefferson, differed from those implemented by Hamilton and other Federalists as they were literal interpretations of the Constitution and focused on establishing an American republic with limited powers. The events leading up to the creation of the Constitution greatly magnified the differing ideas and policies …show more content…
In a time of increasing desire for a stronger national government, Republican views upheld their fear that state governments would lose power, that the Constitution lacked individual rights, and that the government would be run by wealthy men. However, Alexander Hamilton, a leading Federalist, intended to strengthen the national government by promoting various economic policies. His three reports to Congress, notably the reports on public credit, the national bank, and manufacturers, generally attempted to increase public credit, establish the first bank of the country, and raise reasonable taxes in order to pay off debts and create a strong and …show more content…
These policies were directly opposed by Republican leaders such as Jefferson, who called his plans “unconstitutional.” Hamilton’s economic policies were a form of loose interpretation of the constitutional clause “necessary and proper”, whereas the Republican’s views espoused a stricter view. This differing view of the meaning of the Constitution further led to Federalist attempts to shun their opposing party through policies that were deemed unconstitutional. The Naturalization Act, Alien Act, and Sedition Act attempted to thwart Republicans from becoming citizens and inhibited the public spread of Republican ideas that opposed those of the Federalists. Despite these suppressive Federalist policies, Jefferson’s term of presidency intended to lead the country on a different path; he viewed the yeomen farming families, people who work and live on the land in which they own, as the future power and voice of America and subsequently, implemented various policies that characterized a Republican type of government. Whereas Federalist ideas viewed expansion of land as potentially dangerous, Jefferson championed ideas of westward expansion by purchasing the enormous Louisiana Territory from France’s leader Napoleon Bonaparte, which encouraged southern farmers to migrate from the south and seek out new fertile lands. In addition to his endeavor to expand into the west, he directly went against Federalist ideas of a stronger national government by actually

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