The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn".

Good Essays
The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim are central to Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Huck's relationships with individual characters are unique in their own way; however, his relationship with Jim is one that is ever changing and sincere. As a poor, uneducated boy, Huck distrusts the morals and intentions of the society that treats him as an outcast and fails to protect him from abuse. The uneasiness about society, and his growing relationship with Jim, leads Huck to question many of the teachings that he has received, especially concerning race and slavery. Twain makes it evident that Huck is a young boy who comes from the lowest levels of white society. Huck's father, Pap, is a drunk who disappears for months on end, and yet the new judge allows Pap to keep custody of Huck. The judge privileges Pap with the right to his son because he is his natural father. "Pap shows[s] noisomely the meanest qualities of his class: superstitious, alcoholic, and shiftless" (Budd 473). Pap is a good example of the imbalanced perceptions of race and thoughts of that particular race can be. The community has failed to protect him. Huck's distance from society makes him question and become skeptical of the world around him and the ideas it passes on to him. Huck often knows better than the adults around him, even though he is missing the assistance that a suitable family and community can present to him. Huck's distrust of the society that surrounds him becomes increasingly clear as he travels down the river with Jim. He is able to view society for the first time in actuality. Due to the fact that, Huck is a compassionate young boy, he battles racism and the hypocrisy of society through his relationship with Jim.

Huck Finn represents the greatest capability that man encompasses, and that is turning into a sensitive, deliberating person rather than a complete product of society. Huck remains accepting of new ideas, and he refuses to completely accept

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain A rational I. Citation Twain, Mark, and Peter Coveney. The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1972. Print. II. Summary The novel is about Huck a thirteen year old boy who goes through many unpleasant events like not being able to get away from his real father in a court case deciding if he may be adopted by another family. But instead the judge sentences him to stay with his father at a cabin. Huck goes to live with him but…

    • 1953 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    fter the success of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, published in 1876, Mark Twain began a book about Tom's more down-to-earth friend, Huckleberry Finn. Twain seems to have had no difficulty capturing Huck's spirit and voice as Huck told his story, but at some point, Twain began to struggle with the narrative. He set the book aside, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn remained unfinished for several years. He wrote and published a number of stories and the narrative account Life on the Mississippi…

    • 450 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    like many other works of literature, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is one in which this reflection of personal experiences is evident. The author; Mark Twain presents his early life experiences to the readers and reveals his perceptive views on society at the time, his feelings towards racism and the slave society, and his childhood hardships through Huck’s journey, not only down the Mississippi River, but also through his journey in morality. Twain’s experiences…

    • 613 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Title: The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Author: Samuel Langhorne Clemens or Mark Twain Date of Publication: 1884 (Great Britain) 1885 (USA) Genre:Bildungsroman, Picaresque, Adventure/Drama Historical information about the period of publication: Twain, although he wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from 1876-1883, based the plot in the pre-Civil War era. During the slave era, there was much political unrest in the country. The Mason-Dixon line drew the line between…

    • 979 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Woodworth 1/17/11 E-Block Mark Twain’s, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is not a racist book because it was written back when the N-word was present in every-day language. Twain constantly used the N-word because it was used in dialect around when it was written. Twain also refers to his not at the beginning of the book to show that his writing is not discriminatory. The portrayal of Jim is based on what twain thought a slave was like. Mark Twain’s use of dialect throughout the story…

    • 351 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", by Mark Twain, is a classic American novel, considered by some to be the finest example of American literature. It follows Huck and Jim, a poor Southern white boy and a runaway slave, as they travel down the Mississippi River in a quest for freedom. Sometimes regarded as a simple children's story, "Huckleberry Finn", while still existing on that level, also has an abundance of symbolism and meaning that's not immediately apparent. The novel contains ideas and…

    • 335 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain is a satire of Southern society during the antebellum era. It is written entirely in the perspective of Huck, a young and simple boy from the South. From the very beginning, Twain warned the readers not to look deeper into the book than what is presented, “Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted” (130). This along with Huck’s perspective allow the readers to come to their own conclusion about what the novel represents…

    • 454 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Is Mark Twain a Racist? Do literary writers see Mark Twain as a racist? Many racial overtones exist in the classic tale of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This has fueled a great controversy by characterizing Mark Twain as a “racist writer”(Powers 495). The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was published two decades after the Civil War, but its antebellum setting obviously makes for many examples of racism and slavery (Pflueger 83). Although Mark Twain’s writing implies offensive racism…

    • 752 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain challenges the traditional notions of its time through the adventures and misadventures of its main character, Huckleberry Finn and the slave Jim. One of the central issues in the story is the issue of slavery. The story takes place in the south in a time when blacks were considered inferior to whites. Mark Twain set the story in 1852 before the civil war, but wrote it after the abolition of slavery in 1865. The development of the relationship Huck has with Jim throughout…

    • 934 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn depicts the racial hierarchy and embedded racist attitudes towards African-Americans in the antebellum South. When exploring the issue of Whiteness in Huckleberry Finn, the reader need only look towards Twain's representation of the character Jim, a runaway slave who is portrayed as the stereotype of the ignorant Southern “negro.” Racism cannot accurately be examined in this novel without considering the way Whiteness becomes personified through Huckleberry…

    • 370 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays