Reflection in Lady Macbeth

Topics: Macbeth, Audience, Performance Pages: 2 (564 words) Published: October 25, 2013

Introducing Lady Macbeth into the Play and the Consequences of the Loss of Confidentiality of the Future

It wasn’t until Scene number 5 of the first act of the play Macbeth that the crusial character of Lady Macbeth is introduced. In order to slow down the introduction of this character, and therefore create suspense and curiosity on the audience, the scene starts as she reads a letter from her husband. This letter informs her of the witches’ prophecy. After this the first blink into Lady Macbeth’s personality is shown as she seems excited by this promise, however she fears her husband is noot brave enough to reach this fate by his own means as his nature is “too full o’the milk of human kindness”. It is ironical that the letter, which is obviously written, is written in prose; in contrast with the speech of Lady Macbeth, which should be in prose, is lirical. Then she speaks of convincing him to be brave as she will fill him with the “valor of her tongue”. This is another way to say that she will persuade him into rushing the fate of him becoming king.

Later in the scene Lady Macbeth is informed of the king’s visit, where she does not even hesitate into elaborating her evil plan. As the messenger leaves, Lady Macbeth has her internal speech of conciousness where she invokes evil spirits to help her be crowned. This internal monologue is extremely important for the development of the play as the audience gets to understand Lady Macbeth as the character that will lead the play to develop into a fatal ending. In this speech (and throught the book) it can be found bird imagery, milk, and baby imagery. In line 38 a raven is used as the channel to announce the king’s death, through hoarse and croaks. Later Lady Macbeth repeatedly invokes things like spirits and thick night, which have evil connotations. The oath she takes to get the thrones is her humananity, she asks the spirits to ‘unsex her’ and take her ‘milk’, in other words to take her femininity and...
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