Preview

Reagan's War on Drugs: A Never Ending Battle

Better Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1554 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Reagan's War on Drugs: A Never Ending Battle
Reagan’s War on Drugs: A Never-ending Battle The phrase “sex, drugs, and rock and roll” held true to its well-earned spot in 1970’s and 1980’s society. With a new, looser culture, explicit music, raunchy and rambunctious movies as well as a societal focus on many things immoral, it was an era of challenging social norms. As the use of recreational and psychoactive drugs, as well as alcohol, increased, a new problem arose; how does law enforcement and the government undo the damage being made by this new society? Laws were passed, bureaus and commissions were formed, and the President of the United States began what he called “The War on Drugs”. Over the years, some of these solutions have proven to make some impact. The initiation, tactics, and attempts at dealing a major blow to drug abuse have all affected the way America sees drugs today. A new type of warfare had made its way into the country, and after all these years, it has made its fair share of positive and negative effects. “Just say no.” (Reagan Declares War on Drugs, 1982). This was one of the many scare tactics used in America’s new war on drugs. The president needed to construct a plan to detract the public eye from drugs’ fame. Nancy Reagan was equally as adamant about keeping America safe and clean. She traveled to and spoke at many schools, enforcing the idea of simply refusing the temptation of drugs. Before the Reagan’s began their wartime, Richard Nixon introduced his own ‘war’ on drugs, stating, “America’s public enemy number one is drug abuse. In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new, all-out offensive.” (Remarks About an Intensified Program for Drug Abuse Prevention, 1971). This mindset was yet another strategy used to make America energized and willing to fight this war. Nixon passed the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act in the 1970’s as a way to keep a constant eye on the drug industry. This act required the pharmaceutical industry to

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Substance Abuse Outline

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Drugs have made a tremendous impact on American society over the past thirty to forty years, yet many Americans are often ambivalent regarding their opinions relating to drugs in terms of decriminalization, availability, impact on society, and mental and physical health impacts. In 1979, some 25 million Americans had tried drugs sometime in the preceding month. Today that figure is 11 million. Bibliography lists 12 sources.…

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The "war on drugs" started over 100 years ago in San Francisco, California when the first law against drugs was enacted to stop the "smoking of opium." In all actuality, this law was against the Chinese people living in the U.S., because they were known for smoking of the opium as a custom. The government feared that opium induced Chinese men would try to lure white women to them. The next drug that was considered illegal was cocaine. The law enacted against cocaine was against Negroes. The government feared that Negroes would use the drug and become violent and go on rampages of raping white women. (Schaffer, n.d.)…

    • 1178 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Although Nixon popularized the term "War on Drugs" when he first used it in 1971, the policies that his administration implemented as part of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970 were a continuation of drug prohibition policies in the U.S. which stretched back to the year 1914. The Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act is a United States federal law that, with subsequent modifications, requires the pharmaceutical…

    • 1776 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    This paper will examine the history of the “War on Drugs” and the racial and sentencing disparities that have resulted because of it. In the House of Representatives a new bill was introduced on January 7, 2009. Policy number H.R.265, was cited as “Drug Sentencing reform and Cocaine Kingpin Trafficking Act of 2009. The never ending drug trade and the policies that try to limit it, have far-reaching impacts in the United States and other countries. Over the last twenty years, U.S. politicians have responded to mounting drug abuse at the local and national levels with increasingly unjustly legislation. Cooperatively, these measures have become known as the ‘War on Drugs’. In the United States, these policies have focused on the link between drug, gang activity, and crime, emphasizing punishment over treatment. Mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenses have been put in place, leading to an explosion in the number of people incarcerated nationwide. Racial disparities in drug sentencing, particularly in crack vs. powder cocaine offenses, also stem from the ‘War on Drugs’ policy. The War on Drugs is a prevention campaign that was established by the United States Government with the aid of participating countries, with the intention of reducing illegal drug trade. This initiative includes a set of laws and policies that are intended to discourage the manufacturing and distribution of illegal substances. The term was first used by then President Richard Nixon in 1969. In June of, Nixon officially declares a "war on drugs," identifying drug abuse as public enemy No. 1. Then in October of 1986 President Ronald Reagan signed the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of, which appropriated $1.7 billion to fight the drug war. The bill also created mandatory minimum penalties for drug offenses, which are criticized for promoting…

    • 2419 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Drug War Research Paper

    • 1339 Words
    • 6 Pages

    It is hard to imagine waging a war on simply an idea or concept. Declaring a war on drugs as a whole encompasses not only the obscuration of illicit narcotics, but also the jailing and killing of those who manufacture, supply, and use said narcotics. Well, In June of 1971, President Richard M. Nixon did just that;…

    • 1339 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Fbn Vs Anslinger

    • 285 Words
    • 2 Pages

    A year after the stock market crashed, 1930, and president Hoover is in office, America is in a state of existential crisis and people are looking for answers and distractions. The Treasury Department created the Federal Bureau of Narcotics under Harry J. Anslinger who directed the agency until 1962 “and molded America’s drug policy” (The United States War on Drugs). Anslinger who was also a prohibitionist, who believed progress could only be achieved by controlling each individual’s impulses and thought that if enough people were put in jail that America would rid itself of drugs. Nonetheless, with these same beliefs, Anslinger, used these to fight the war on drugs. Armed with a Depression snug budget, and an uphill battle Anslinger tried and failed to get state governments involved with the war effort.…

    • 285 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    War on Drugs Has Failed

    • 2403 Words
    • 10 Pages

    While American drug prohibition was in motion via legislation as early as 1875 with the enactment of restrictions on opium, our modern day War on Drugs was officially ushered in by President Nixon on June 17th of 1971. On that day, Nixon declared drug abuse to be "public enemy number one in the United States," and two years later founded the Drug Enforcement Administration -- a law enforcement agency whose purpose was and is to combat the war on drugs ("Thirty"). It is in this two year span that we can rest the beginnings of the political anti-drug agenda we are familiar with today. This point, however, does not mark the birth of American substance prohibition, an effort which truly found its inception with the alcohol prohibition of the 1920s.…

    • 2403 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Best Essays

    For over a century, America has waged a failing war on drugs even as it feeds a cultural apathetic and underground acceptance of drug and alcohol use. The views of the dominate group have placed blame on society’s ills on the evils of rampant drug use throughout the past few hundred years, which have given way to a practice of outlawing , persecution, and imprisonment. Such a view has led to the overflow of our state’s prisons, the race to build even more, and need to fund a culture of imprisonment that has a difficult time in trying to figure out if it wants to help the addicted person, or continue to try and fund a gluttonous prison machine. We will look at some of the causes for the failed war on drugs, and some of the consequences if our society continues to ignore the need to help the addict, or simply lock them away.…

    • 2479 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Drugs: Americas Holy War

    • 1274 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In the article “Drugs: America’s Holy War,” Arthur Benavie speaks of the social problems that can arise with the use and supply of illicit and illegal drugs. He begins asking the reader, who’s the enemy in this war on drugs? I asked myself in the beginning if is it even realistic to assume there is an actual war on drugs. Benavie explains that society is constantly reminded of the harmful effects of certain drugs such as marijuana, heroin, LSD, ecstasy, cocaine, morphine, methamphetamine, amphetamines, codeine, valium, and narcotics. However, society forgets that there are people out there that take certain drugs for a reason. The drug scene causes many complaints within society as it’s seen as a cause of violence, diseases, corruption, social disorder, and an increase in crime rates. The drug war is probable as drugs are seen as also being sinful, disruptive, a threat to authority of parents and social order, as well as a danger to our economic system. In many instances, those that use drugs illegally are being punished worse than some rapists and murderers. Some of these criminals are also being treated as if they were a murderer. This article raises a lot of questions that some may or may not agree with. Personally, this article has left me confused and very frustrated with our legal systems.…

    • 1274 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Many have said that the war on drugs is a failure and needs reform. Others have lamented that the war on drugs is a war that cannot be won and valuable resources and money has been used up. Drugs are cheaper, purer, and more easily obtained than ever before. The war on drugs is futile. This paper will discuss why the United States should end the war on drugs.…

    • 555 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Although Richard Nixon first declared a “war on drugs” in 1971, the war escalated during the Reagan presidency and shifted its focus from treatment toward incarceration and law enforcement. As George Moss and Evan Thomas explain, Reagan came to Washington “committed to waging a war on drugs and bringing the international drug trade under control” in 1981. Thanks to the rise of the Medellin Cartel in Colombia and other cartels in Latin America during the 1980s, illegal drug trade networks flourished, and America became “the world’s major consumer of illicit drugs.” This increased usage of drugs led to many social crises, including heightened urban crime and health problems, which encouraged both the Reagan administration and private groups…

    • 1367 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    On June 17, 1971, President Richard Nixon committed what is arguably one of his most significant and lasting executive acts when he issued a special message to Congress regarding the growing drug abuse problem within the United States. Although this message was significant in many ways because of the public acknowledgment that the Federal Government was not doing enough to combat drugs and their associated ills, this message is mostly remembered as the origin of the term the War on Drugs. We are now over forty years removed from that “declaration of war,” and not only has the United States ' drug problem remained, it has grown to unthinkable proportions,…

    • 2037 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    In the 1980s and early ‘90s, Nancy Reagan proposed an anti-drugs campaign with the slogan Just Say No. Her solution to the drug problem was to teach children to say no to drugs, and rely on self-restraint to defeat temptation. Reagan believed children would be able to turn away from drugs if they had parents who raised them to be morally sound. Conservatives give priority to Moral Strength, and see those who use marijuana and drugs as morally weak and lacking self-control. A drug user, then, must change their personal values instead of relying on drug treatment centers or social change in order to quit their habit, Lakoff explains, “If the metaphor of Moral Strength has priority over other forms of explanation, then your poverty or your…

    • 1267 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Nixon's Drug War

    • 1045 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The drug war,created by Nixon in June 1971 created many devastating consequences around the world, including the breaking of families,the skyrocketing of crime rate,and of course some of the worst people in history getting into power.One of the biggest supporter of the drug war Rodrigo Duterte was born into a religious household and the violent city of Davao.Some of the people had nothing but hatred and the people who supported him they has been had,them have been smudged. He was called a monster,liar,and a murder but,now we might another Hitler or another Stalin in the form of Duterte.Men become what his past led him to and he now is another one of the mass killer,but he can possibly become another record breaking killer.…

    • 1045 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    War on drugs is a term brought to life by President Nixon in June of 1971 that urges the prohibition of drugs. At the time of the rise of the term, Nixon stated that the drug abuse was ”public enemy number one”. The ground giver for the drug war was not, as one might think, an effect of the neighborhoods where drug use is prominent, or festivals where drugs are frequent, but concerns regarding the rise of drug use amongst the soldiers in Vietnam. In his book Chasing the scream, Johann Hari explains that 20 percent of the soldiers in Vietnam were using a substantial amount of heroine and that the news reports from that time expressed worries about a future where there would possibly be many addicts after the war. On January of 1972, President…

    • 167 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays