Reader response

Satisfactory Essays
Patrice Flowers
Professor Arzola
English 1302
Friday, February 22, 2013

Critical Analysis of Nora Ephron “The Boston Photographs” Nora Ephron author of “The Boston Photographs” reaches out to her readers by touching their emotions by some gripping photographs. She claims “Photojournalism is often more powerful than written journalism,” this theory is proven in her writing. In Ephron essay, she discusses the photographs that Stanley Foreman took of an attempted rescue that turned to a devastating event and how the public responded to the controversial photographs. Not only did the author defend the photographs by stating the power photojournalism has but, she also indicated that the media somewhat censors information that is given to the public. Ephron provides statements from individuals that were employed by newspapers that printed the photos, and feedback from readers that seen the photos in the paper how they were touched by photographs and the emotions that was felt when seeing them. The author states in the fifth paragraph, “Most newspaper editors anticipate some reader reaction to photographs like Foreman’s; even so, the response around the country was enormous, and almost all of it was negative (170 para.5)”. She goes on to tell about all the negative letters readers have wrote to the papers voicing their opinions on the photos that Forman took. Some people were stating that the photos “Invaded the privacy of death (170 para5)” calling them even “Cheap sensationalism”. On the other hand, some editors stood behind the photos defending them in their columns. Good or bad reviews people responded to the photos they moved the readers, which further justifies what the author states that photojournalism is more powerful then written. In addition to all the negative responses, the author also explained how the newspapers editors put more thought into what they print in the papers because of the effect of the photographs Forman took. Mid-point in the

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