Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy Case Study

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There are two components to the CBT family; Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT) and Cognitive Therapy (CT). Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy was developed by psychiatrist, Dr. Albert Ellis. REBT takes a comprehensive approach to psychological treatment that deals with the emotional and behavioral aspects of human disturbance, but with emphasis on the cognitive component (Gomathy & Singh, 2007). Ellis believed that psychological problems originate from misperceptions and mistaken cognitions about what was perceived. Additionally, problems also occur from emotional under reactions or over reactions to normal and unusual stimuli; and from habitual dysfunctional behavior patterns which enabled them to keep repeating non-adjustive responses

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