Range of Motion exercise

Topics: Joints, Foot, Extension Pages: 11 (1113 words) Published: January 9, 2014
Chapter 28
RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISES
What You Will Learn


The purposes of range of motion exercises



Types of range of motion exercises



The In-Home Aide’s responsibilities when giving range of motion exercises



How to give range of motion exercises according to proper procedure

Purposes of Range of Motion Exercises (ROM)
The musculoskeletal system must be exercised to remain healthy. ROM exercises prevent joints from becoming stiff and contractures (deformities) from developing. ROM exercises allow clients' joints to move more freely and as a result, the clients remain more independent. They prevent the loss of minerals from bones (osteoporosis) and improve circulation. ROM exercises also prevent muscles from losing strength and shrinking (atrophy).

Types of Range of Motion Exercises
Active ROM means that the client performs the exercises alone or uses a device such as a pulley or bicycle.
Passive ROM means that the exercise is done for the client who is unable to move independently. It involves moving the client's body parts through a series of exercises. The In-Home Aide’s Responsibilities When Giving Range of Motion Exercises Always check with the supervisor/nurse and the plan of care for instructions or limitations before starting ROM exercises. Always handle the client gently with open palms. Be aware of the normal ROM for each joint. Support each joint above and below the joint being exercised. This prevents joint pain and possible injury. Exercise as many times as ordered, usually three to five times. Never exercise or stretch a joint to the point of pain. Exercise joints only within the range of easy movement. Always stop the exercise if discomfort, pain, or spasms develop and contact the supervisor/nurse for further instructions.

In addition to regularly scheduled range of motion exercises, exercises can be incorporated into activities of daily living. Allow client to assist in procedure as much as possible.
Remember, hyperextension of the neck is not possible with the client in a supine position.

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Chapter 28
RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISES
PROCEDURE FOR GIVING RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISES:
NOTE: CHECK SERVICE PLAN FOR INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE PERFORMING
RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISES.
1. Wash your hands.
2. Explain what you are going to do.
3. Provide privacy. Make sure client is wearing adequate clothing. 4. Raise bed to a comfortable working height if possible.
5. Assist client into supine position.
6. Shoulder (see Figure 28.1).

Figure 28.1
Shoulder Exercises

Flexion (arm
raised over head,
close to ear)

Extension (arm straight
down at side)

3. Internal/External Rotation
2. Abduction/Adduction
1. Flexion/Extension

a.

Flexion/extension.
1)

2)
b.

Support the arm at the wrist and elbow and lift the arm toward the ceiling. Continue lifting the arm over the client's head until you feel resistance.
Slowly lower the arm to the client's side.

Abduction/adduction.
225

1)

2)
c.

Support the arm at the elbow and shoulder and move the arm out to the side. Continue moving toward client’s head.
Slowly move the arm back toward the center of body.

Internal/external rotation.
1)
2)

7.

Move the arm away from the body to shoulder level.
Bring the hand forward to touch the bed and then backward to touch the bed.
Figure 28.2
Elbow Exercises

Elbow (see Figure 28.2).

Flexion (bend elbow)

Extension (straighten elbow)

a.

Supination (using handshake
grasp, turn palm of hand upward)

Pronation (turning palm of
hand downward)

Flexion/extension.
1)

Bend the arm at the elbow, touch the shoulder, and then straighten the arm.

2)

Bend the arm at the elbow and touch the chin, then straighten the arm.
b.

Supination/Pronation.

1)

2)
8.

Hold the client's hand in a handshake position; support the arm at the elbow joint.
Turn palm of the hand toward the floor and then toward the ceiling.

Wrist (see...
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