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Alice 's Adventures in Wonderland
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"Alice in Wonderland" redirects here. For other uses, see Alice in Wonderland (disambiguation).
|Alice 's Adventures in Wonderland |
|[pic] |
|Title page of the original edition (1865) |
|Author(s) |Lewis Carroll |
|Illustrator |John Tenniel |
|Country |England |
|Language |English |
|Genre(s) |Fiction |
|Publisher |Macmillan |
|Publication date |26 November 1865 |
|Followed by |Through the Looking-Glass |

Alice 's Adventures in Wonderland (commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll.[1] It tells of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world (Wonderland) populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults as well as children.[2] It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre,[2][3] and its narrative course and structure, characters and imagery have been enormously influential[3] in both popular culture and literature, especially in the fantasy genre.

|Contents |
|1 Background |
|2 Synopsis |
|3 Characters



References: 3. ^ a b Schwab, Gabriele (1996) "Chapter 2: Nonsense and Metacommunication: Alice in Wonderland" The mirror and the killer-queen: otherness in literary language Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, pp. 49–102, ISBN 978-0-253-33037-6 4 8. ^ (Gardner, 1965) 9 19. ^ a b Gardner, Martin (1990). More Annotated Alice. New York: Random House. p. 363. ISBN 978-0-394-58571-0. 20. ^ Bayley, Melanie (2010-03-06). "Algebra in Wonderland". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 12 March 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-13. 22. ^ Lewis Carroll (2009). Alice 's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-955829-2. 24. ^ Graham Ovenden and John Davis, The Illustrations of Alice in Wonderland, 1972, Academy, London and St. Martin 's, New York 25 28. ^ Carroll, Lewis (1995). The Complete, Fully Illustrated Works. New York: Gramercy Books. ISBN 978-0-517-10027-1. 29. ^ Page 11 of Introduction, by John Davies, of Ovenden, Graham (1972). The Illustrators of Alice. New York: St. Martin 's Press. p. 102. ISBN 978-0-902620-25-4. 30. ^ Basbanes, Nicholas (1999). A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-8050-6176-5. 33. ^ "Royal Ballet Takes a Chance on Alice". Time. 2011-03-03. • Carpenter, Humphrey (1985). Secret Gardens: The Golden Age of Children 's Literature. Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 978-0-395-35293-9. • Gardner, Martin (2000). The Annotated Alice: the definitive edition. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 978-0-393-04847-6. • Ray, Gordon Norton (1991). The Illustrator and the book in England from 1790 to 1914. New York: Dover. ISBN 978-0-486-26955-9. • GASL.org: First editions of Alice 's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There With 92 Illustrations by Tenniel, 1866/1872.

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