Racism A Social Issue in the USA

Topics: Sociology, Social work, Culture Pages: 6 (1983 words) Published: December 11, 2013


My Ideological Perspective: Disaffected
Comfort Dondo-Dewey
SOWK 281
December 5th, 2013
Dr. Katharine Hill

Introduction
The purpose of this paper is to critically identify and analyze how the multiple influences have shaped my Ideological world views on important social issues such as, poverty, racism, classism,immigration,obesity,crime and the justice system as well as health care disparities. In this paper, I will identify how these worldview perspectives relate to some of the principles listed in the NASW Code of Ethics; Social work for social justice and also the UN Declaration on Human Rights principles. Lastly, this paper attempts to identify any conflicts and or harmonies I possess towards the professional frameworks of social work. Religious and Socio-economical Perspectives

Based on my responses to the political typology quiz, I am Disaffected, along with 11% of the American public. The Disaffected are a group of individuals that is highly critical of both government and business, while sympathizing with the poor by supporting social welfare programs. Immigration matters are a strong concern for this group. For the most part, the majority of this group believes that the country cannot solve many of its important problems and they are conservative both religiously and socially. This group of people is comprised of people who are mostly financially stressed; nearly half describe their households as struggling and about two-thirds only have a high school education or less. 26% possess a US passport, which is below the national average. Interestingly, 23% of this group of people follow NASCAR racing compared to the national average of 33%. More disaffected is parents (44%).To a larger extend, the typology quiz was somewhat accurate; I do sympathize with the poor and also support social welfare programs. On the contrary, however, I do entirely believe that country can solve its issues and I believe that I am a liberal socially and religiously.

I believe my Ideological perspectives and values have been greatly influenced my religious and social upbringing; born and raised in a conservative, rich and very traditional family, I grew up looking at life from the lens of a socially, religiously, conservative and privileged perspective. Having said so, however, I have not always agreed with my father’s involvement in Zimbabwean politics and the corruption that came with that position. I have always acknowledged my privileges over others, especially the unequal distribution of wealth between those in politics and government and the average person in Zimbabwe. I have always had my own disagreements with the institution of dictatorship and patriarchy; I still believe that most of my young adult life, I have looked at life from a more conservative lens, but also questioned inequalities in my community. Changes in Perspectives

Immigrating to the United States at a very young age forced me to live and experience other cultures and religions, especially while attending the College of Saint Catherine. Upon arriving at the College of Saint Catherine, my life changed because I was given the opportunity to gain exposure to life experiences that were taboo to my belief systems, including exposure to the LGBTQ community and other religious practices other than the Christian practice that I am familiar with; I have been exposed to Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Atheism to name a few. Being a minority woman, for the first time, it was easy for me to associate with others from different cultures who were similar to myself; hence my ability to change my perspectives on some social, religious and also socio-economic issues. My views and my definition of poverty have changed since I moved to the United States. I used to have a limited knowledge of what it meant to be a minority group or to be poor. Having to deal with the triple jeopardies of being female, black and an immigrant, I have endured issues like...

References: Dean, R. G. (2001). The Myth of Cross-Cultural Competence . Families in Society:The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 623-625.
Marla-Berg-Weger. (2013). Social Work and Social Welfare. New York : Routledge.
Nations, U. (2013, August 23). www.unitednations.org. Retrieved from www.un.org/humanrights/clause25: http://unitednation.rog
Dean, R. G. (2001). The Myth of Cross-Cultural Competence . Families in Society:The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 623-625
Dean, R. G. (2001). The Myth of Cross-Cultural Competence . Families in Society:The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 623-625.
Marla-Berg-Weger. (2013). Social Work and Social Welfare. New York : Routledge.
Nations, U. (2013, August 23). www.unitednations.org. Retrieved from www.un.org/humanrights/clause25: http://unitednation.rog
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