Qualitative Research Critique

Better Essays
RUNNING HEAD: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRTIQUE

Qualitative Research Article Critique
November 16, 2011

Overall critique:
This paper is an article critique written by Alexander & Clare (2004) titled: You still feel different: The experience and meaning of women’s self-injury in the context of a lesbian or bisexual identity. This study’s purpose was to explore the meaning behind females’ self-injurious behavior within the context of being a lesbian or bisexual. It aimed to better understand this behavior and the many roles that self-injury can serve for individuals. The article can be considered a high-quality qualitative research article for various reasons. In sum, it addresses a topic that has been researched very little, it aims to explore meaning and subjective experience of participants, is exploratory nature, uses a phenomenological research design and makes interpretations using a subjective and reflexive approach.
Statement of the Problem: This article does a good job of clearly outlining the statement of the problem. In the introduction, it succinctly identifies the problem concerning the rise of self-injurious behavior and how it affects people of all ages and backgrounds and can eventually lead to suicide. Of particular importance to the study is self-injurious behavior among females with a lesbian and/or bisexual identity. The authors note that little research has been done concerning self-injury and this specific population. One weakness of this study’s statement of the problem is that the authors only mention mental health professionals as the primary audience who could benefit from the study and fail to mention any other specific audiences.
In terms of the need for a qualitative approach, the article clearly points out that there is a need to “explore” the meaning behind lesbian and bisexuals’ self-injurious behavior, in order to gain a better understanding behind self-injury behavior in a wider social context. Additionally, the



References: Alexander, N., & Clare, L. (2004). You still feel different: The experience and meaning of women’s self-injury in the context of a lesbian or bisexual identity. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 14, 70-84.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    One night in 1983 a drunk driver had hit Sharon Kowalski, severely damaging her brain-stem and leaving her paralyzed and unable to speak. Kowalski was in a relationship with Karen Thompson at the time, and Karen sought out only the best rehabilitation center for her lover. Kowalski’s parents, on the other hand, were only concerned with separating Karen from their daughter, and not her well being. This brings us to the first oppression these two individuals have had to encounter: heterosexism.…

    • 890 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Annotated Bibliography

    • 713 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The three articles that have been selected are directly associated with the phenomenon of self-injurious behavior. The question as to why self-injury takes place, whether self-destructive behavior is originated in childhood and possible factors that may play a part and the study of two women cutting as a means to cope are discussed in the following three articles. The first article conducted a study to identify why people injure themselves. It was found that there are three main reasons that are indicative of self-injury. Self-Punishment, Coping with emotions, and extreme rage are three primary reasons people engage in harming themselves. The second article finds that trauma encountered in childhood plays a significant part in the initial participation in self-destructive behavior. In addition, a person without secure attachments is more apt to continue self-destructive behavior. The third article presented illustrated two personal accounts of self-injurious behavior. The two women in the study were found to have exhibited this behavior because of insufficient coping skills. Both women had also faced some form of childhood trauma that aided in this behavior.…

    • 713 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Self Harm

    • 1033 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Self-harm is a growing and troubling trend. It's a frightening disorder, most common among women, where hurt and alienation are expressed by injuring oneself. There are several kinds of self-harm. Self-mutilation and various eating disorders are among the most common forms of self-destruction. These forms of self-harm often lead to suicide. There are three types of self-mutilation. The rarest and most extreme form is Major self-mutilation. This form usually results in permanent disfigurement, such as castration or limb amputation. Another form is Stereo-typical self-mutilation. This usually consists of head banging, eyeball pressing, and biting. The third and most common form is Superficial self-mutilation. This involves cutting, burning, hair pulling, bone breaking, hitting, interference with wound healing, and basically anything that causes harm to oneself. It's almost unimaginable that one would inflict injury upon oneself. However, cutting, burning, slashing, stabbing, and bruising occurs while apparently no physical pain is felt. As many as three million Americans are believed to be suffering from this psychiatric disorder. (Simpson) The very nature of this problem is shrouded in secrecy. It is no surprise that it has taken some time for people to get wise to this growing problem. There are several different theories as to why one engages in such behavior. One popular theory is that it's a control issue. There are also several reasons for a need for control. For instance, when children are abused, they are in a situation of no control. Their abusers can hurt them at anytime, and the children are largely powerless to stop it. When the child grows older and is faced with stressful situations, it is easy to feel out of control. There is often a strong desire or expectation for pain, because pain is associated with stress in that person's mind. People who have had these associations forced upon them frequently cut themselves because it satisfies a psycho-logical…

    • 1033 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Psychologists have examined various theories as to why humans sometimes behave in a self-destructive ways. One proposed theory that answers this question is the Freudian argument, which states “people have an innate death drive that impels them to pursue their own downfall and death”2. This argument also concludes that people do harm themselves deliberately, even though they sometimes are not conscious of this. “Self-defeating behaviours are especially common when people feel that others view them less favourably than the people desire”1…

    • 2831 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Self-injury is a behavior in which people deliberately harm their own bodies in some way to cope with overwhelming emotions. Self-injury frequently is an impulsive act. You may become upset and spontaneously seek a way to hurt yourself, recklessly doing damage to their body. Other times, self-injury may be inflicted in a controlled, methodical manner. You may even plan it in advance, taking steps to avoid detection and to prevent infections. This act of behavior is not an attempt at suicide. With self-injury, the intent isn’t to die, but to inflict bodily harm. However, self-injury can accidentally result in suicide.…

    • 2371 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    One’s culture has consistently profiled women throughout time. During the 19th century, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel The Scarlet Letter, depicts Hester Prynne as an adulteress and humiliated as punishment by wearing a scarlet letter. Long before social media, language against women’s sexuality has existed. Throughout time it became culturally acceptable to refer women as sexual slurs and afterwards shun and shame them. Because the only punished people were the victims, it created a society that bullies women into thinking they are less than those who claim they are. Consequently, a series of mental breakdowns ensure because of slut-shaming. These include depression, self-loathing, suicide, and long-term repercussions. A society’s language often persecutes a group of people. Specifically, the term “slut” shames women from acknowledging oneself and deliberately accuses them for being worthless than “normal”…

    • 999 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Trevor Project

    • 4923 Words
    • 20 Pages

    Researchers have found that suicide among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender youth (LGBT) is comparatively higher than among the general population. According to some groups, this is linked to heterocentric cultures and institutionalised homophobia in some cases, including the use of LGBT people as a political wedge issue like in the contemporary efforts to halt legalising same-sex marriages[citation needed]. Depression and drug use among LGBT people have both been shown to increase significantly after new laws that discriminate against gay people are passed.[1]…

    • 4923 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Mor, V., Mukamel, D.B., & Spector, W. D. (2009). The costs of turnover in nursing homes. The Costs of Turnover in Nursing Homes. Retrieved from www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/... National Center for Biotechnology Information…

    • 1174 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Qualitative Critique

    • 2506 Words
    • 8 Pages

    IntroductionThis study examined qualitative research on "Pregnancy and protection: Perceptions, attitudes and experiences of Australian female adolescents" to determine designs and methods used and to discover emergent themes across study. Most of the study reviewed was described as qualitative or phenomenological by design and included samples comprising of Australian females participants exclusively. Based on analysis of the collective primary findings of the sample research studys, three themes were identified: (a) Perceptions, (b) attitudes and (c) experiences of Australian female adolescents. Overall, the study revealed that most adolescent females perceive pregnancy as a rite of passage and a challenging yet positive life event. This qualitative study needed involving participants from same ethnic backgrounds, perceptions relative to adolescent pregnancy and, about decision-making relevant to pregnancy resolution, intimacy, and peer relationships.…

    • 2506 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Nurses are responsible in providing holistic, quality care to their clients. In order to effectively provide such care Boswell and Cannon (2009, p. 2 & 7) states that nurses must base their provision of care on the most current, up-to-date health information available and sound nursing knowledge. This is where evidence-based practice (EBP) comes in. Polit and Beck (2010, p. 4) defined EBP as "the use of the best clinical evidence in making patient care desicions". This usually comes from research conducted by nurses and other healthcare professionals. Thus it is pertinent that research reports are critically analyzed.…

    • 2618 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Center for Disease Control. (n.d.). Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury. Retrieved March 16, 2010, from Center for Disease Control Web site: http:/ / cdc.gov/ nchs/ fastats/ suicide.htm…

    • 5977 Words
    • 24 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Self-harm is considered a major public health issue at present (Mental Health Foundation, 2006. Cleaver, 2007). The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) describes self-harm as ‘self-poisoning or self-injury, irrespective of the apparent purpose of the act’ (2004:16). The incidence of self-harm in young people appears to be increasing and there is a strong link between self-harm and increased risk of completed suicide (Cleaver, 2007). McDougall and Brophy (2006) produced a summary of the Mental Health Foundation publication, Truth Hurts, examining the implications for nurses and mental health professionals. They report that the incidence of self harm has risen by 30% since the 1980’s and that children are self-harming at increasingly younger ages. The only reference to parents is to state that young people sometimes self harm to ‘cope with... conflict between parents’ (2006:14) and that young people find relatives least helpful of all available support mechanisms.…

    • 4115 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Transgender people have a different and unique set of health issues. They have greater risks for mental health issues due to the internal conflict and stigmatism of being transgender and have a higher risk for anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, post traumatic stress disorder, and drug addiction. (NAMI, 2007) People that live this lifestyle deal with negative societal attitudes. Some may find that their employers are not accepting of their decision to live as a man and are fired from their jobs. Others may have family members who do not understand their reasoning for wanting to dress and act the way they do and are disowned. (Transgender Health, 2010) Unfortunately, with today’s lack of understanding for these individuals, they have a higher risk for violence. The incidences of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse are greater among this population then in the mainstream population. (Bostwick, 2007)…

    • 582 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Huffington Post

    • 644 Words
    • 3 Pages

    You see, I had never been explicitly exposed to the socially-propagated idea that women are emotionally unstable. When I found out, I felt rather embarrassed in not only being sexist, but in being so trite and un-profound in doing so. I am simply an observer of humanity, and although some people might suggest that I have internalized institutional misogyny, herein lies the purpose of my short essay.…

    • 644 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    To better define and describe self-mutilation, a concept analysis was performed. The first step was collecting information. Numerous electronic databases and the World Wide Web were searched using the words self-mutilation, self-injury and cutting. Factors for inclusion in the analysis were that the articles must be from a peer reviewed journal, must be printed in English, and must discuss the act of self-mutilation. Forty of the 213 abstracts reviewed were chosen for evaluation because they discussed self –mutilation unrelated to a suicide attempt or a mental illness. It was then narrowed down to 26 articles that provided a sufficent definition of self-mutilation. Two books were found and included as a result of an examination of a reference list.…

    • 485 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays

Related Topics