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Qeen Elizabeth Dbq

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Qeen Elizabeth Dbq
Throughout early European history women had not held high positions of political, religious, and social power. However, this all changed when Elizabeth I became the Queen of England, and the Supreme Head of the Anglican Church from 1558-1603. Even with Elizabeth in charge many people including Protestant’s, and Catholic’s were biased, and unhappy about her reign. The English however, who were biased to the thought of a female ruler in the being, had grown to love and adore their new monarch. With these responses to Elizabeth being in power, she responds with her head high trying to prove her devotion to her country, and people. Throughout Elisabeth’s reign many people including both Protestant’s and Catholic opposed the thought of a female ruler. In John Knox’s First Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women (Document 1) he states that to promote women to rule any realm, and nation is against God’s word. He states that the bible says it is forbidden for women to occupy the place of God. We can assume Knox to be biased by the fact that he is a Protestant religious reformer, and the fact he is a man. Likewise, in Nicholas Heath’s, archbishop of York, debate before the House of Lords (Document 2) he pleaded the rule of a woman is forbidden. Heath thought women were not allowed to preach, or minister the holy sacraments. In Christ’s church women were not allowed to be an apostle, or preacher, therefore Elizabeth cannot be the supreme head of Christ’s Church. This too is biased because he is a traditional male ruler, and believes in the traditional church. Similarly, the bishops of the Church of England wrote a book The Second Book of Homilies (Document 5) that stated their opposition. The bishop’s book stated that the husband, or man, should be leader and author of love. The women should obey their husband, and cease from commanding. Wives must be ready at their husband’s commandment. This shows bias even though they are Bishops of England,

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