Punjabi Sikh Cultural Perspective: How Spiritual Are The People

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Having come to the United States from other countries, many people tended to face difficulties connected with the cultural adjustment. Especially those problems became evident if the cultural beliefs of the newcomers radically differed from the ones of the inhabitants. Even though the United States was considered a country of diversity, tolerance to the people of other origins and other cultures was not easy to develop. In this situation, the newcomers had to hide their values or refuse from them in order to become a part of the new society and the new community.
The depicted in the film situation with the family of the Punjabi Sikh shows how spiritual are the people. At the same time, the unwillingness of the family to change their views and appearance reveals the conservatism of the family. In addition, the family believed that the United States would become a temporary home for them and that they would turn back to their homeland. That is why they wanted to keep the traditions. Another reason for them to secure their beliefs might have been the undesired moving to the United States. As the wife said in an episode with her
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While the family came in search of the education for their children, this step was obligatory for children to be able to go to school without problems. While in some understanding, the cutting of hair might have been treated as the sign of the loss of culture, as some of the men in the film indicated, there was another way to see this event. It did not necessarily mean the refusal from identity since children still were in the same cultural environment of their parents and were brought up as before. Some of the men discussing the problem with the father said that cutting the hair is a necessity for the brighter future of the children. Hence, wishing happiness to his children, the father agreed to break the

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