Pulp Fiction

Satisfactory Essays
Daniela Gonzalez
October 29, 2014
Humanities
Pulp Fiction Pulp Fiction was written and directed by Quentin Tarantino in 1994. Winning an Academy Award, Pulp Fiction is 20th century classic very popular amongst the generations that came after being released. Tarantino achieves humor through a well written and witty dialogue that uses classical narrative elements such as parallelism. Characters wander between the four overlapping narratives. He deliberately confuses the audience with fragmentation of the narratives which lets us create the story in our own mind giving us a sense of delight. I watched Pulp Fiction to be able to write this appreciation essay thinking it would be a lame, old movie about drug addicts and after hearing from various sources that it is a good film, I realized, no they are wrong, this is a great film that goes further than drugs and not too harsh violence. Pulp Fiction keeps viewers intrigued in a unique style. The movie is very layered, and by layered I mean each really interesting part in each scene (yes, there is one in just about every scene) doesn’t seem forced like in some movies, instead Pulp Fiction was written to come off more natural and has a seemingly charming flow for a crime movie. This film has just about everything important in a movie to hook somebody; containing quotable dialogue throughout the entire film, humor, cringing violence, intensity, intimacy, romance, action, and vulgarity, Pulp Fiction is said to be one of Tarantino’s best films for its exemplification in puzzlement and mystification. Throughout the movie there is a briefcase that ties in to all the events and each time it is opened there is a light shone upon the characters faces where they then go pale with amazement or shock, though the audience is never able to see what is inside the briefcase, only a handful of viewers will be able to put together that the light coming out of the briefcase is the lost soul. Tarantino’s technique creates a blissful

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