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Psychotherapy-Talk Therapy

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Psychotherapy-Talk Therapy
Therapy, when used to treat depression, often comes in the form of psychotherapy- talk therapy (DBSA, n.d.). Talk therapy involves both talking about problems, and working towards solutions to those problems (DBSA, n.d.). It can help a person with depression understand their illness, overcome their insecurities or fears, cope with stress, improve relationships, and end destructive habits (DBSA, n.d.). It can also help teach them new ways to think about situations to overcome inbred responses. A therapist comes in the form of a psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker, counselor or psychiatric nurse (DBSA, n.d.). In the first few sessions the patient will likely be doing the most talking; telling the therapist why you are there and what you

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