Psychoanalytic Theory on Dacula

Good Essays
Andy Dodge
English 271
Marxist Approach of Dracula
12/17/10

According to Dictionary.com, a vampire is “a corpse, animated by an undeparted soul or demon, that periodically leaves the grave and disturbs the living, until it is exhumed and impaled or burned.” Our society’s view of Vampires has unfortunately been tarnished by several novels that shall remain nameless. Bram Stoker’s Dracula, however, is an excellent novel that shows just how menacing vampires should be. More importantly, it is a classic book that can provide many different readings and analyses. By using a Marxist approach, elements of this book can be easily compared to the oppression and eventual overthrow of a dictatorship style government. Dracula and Trannsylvania represent an oppressed country being run by a dictator. Team Van Helsing, consisting of Van Helsing, Harker, Mina, Lucy, Seward, Holmwood, and Morris, represent the upper middle class of a neighboring country. When Dracula begins expanding his rule into Team Van Helsing’s country, they eventually revolt and overthrow him, In Dracula, Count Dracula represents a dictator ruling over an oppressed country, which is represented by Trannsylvania. Dracula lives in a castle right outside of the city of Trannsylvania, where he feasts on it’s inhabitants. Vampires don’t have blood in their own bodies, so they need to continuously drink blood of living creatures to replenish their ever-draining supply. This is extremely similar to how a dictator runs a country. They have absolute power over everyone else and do things only to gain more power. Both dictators and Dracula use the capitalist deception to gain capital by turning human life into power. Dictators use labor plus the actual time people live to gain wealth. Dracula directly turns human life into power. This creates a massive surplus on the side of the dictator. Dracula also has his minions to seduce Harker. Stoker writes “The fair girl went on her knees and bent over me, fairly

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Psychoanalytic Theory

    • 1331 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Sigmund Freud has investigated the Psychoanalytic Theory (1856-1939). This theory caused great inconvenience when delivered and accepted a systematic war because Freud revealed the importance and impact of human sexual impulses stressing that culture is built over their oppression. The Psychology of Conflict is one of the basic principles in the Psychoanalytic theory which sees the function of the mind as the expression of conflicting powers. Some of these forces are conscious but the key is unconscious…

    • 1331 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Psychoanalytic Theory

    • 2151 Words
    • 9 Pages

    THE PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY I. Overview of Freud 's Psychoanalytic Theory Freud 's psychoanalysis is the best known of all personality theories because it (1) postulated the primacy of sex and aggression—two universally popular themes; (2) attracted a group of followers who were dedicated to spreading psychoanalytic doctrine; and (3) advanced the notion of unconscious motives, which permit varying explanations for the same observations. II. Biography of Sigmund Freud Although he was…

    • 2151 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychoanalytic Theory

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In this paper I will be talking about the founder of the psychoanalytic theory, Sigmund Freud. Who came up with many ways to find out why we do the things we do and think the way we think. Sigmund Freud was an awesome mind that thought things and put it on paper that we might would think was too offending to others. Throughout the decades his work has been deciphered by many people who try to make sense of it, and in this paper I will try to let you know what understanding I got from the readings…

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychoanalytic Theories

    • 786 Words
    • 4 Pages

    University of Phoenix | Psychoanalytic Theories | Psy 250 | LaTanya Henry-Smith | Cylvania Allen-Pringle | 4/9/2013 | | In order to fully understand personality, one can observe the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Alfred Adler. To comprehend the theories of all three psychologists and how they came about, one must learn how they were studied. According to the Webster’s online dictionary, theories are concepts that are not yet verified, but if true, would…

    • 786 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychoanalytic Theories

    • 758 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Psychoanalytic Theories The psychoanalytic theories of Freud, Jung, and Adler are similar in so many ways, but different at the same time. Each one starts their theories of by studying the behavior of young children as they developed into young adults. By studying their behavior as a child showed that, the events and activities that the child experience affected them as adults. What the child experienced at a young age affected each child differently, from making them feel inferior or powerless…

    • 758 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychoanalytic Theory

    • 2466 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Psychoanalytic Theory by: Sigmund Freud Sigmund Freud Sigmund Freud was born as Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939). He is psychology’s most famous figure, one of the most influential and controversial thinkers. He is a Viennese Physician who wanted to devote himself to medical research, but limited funds and barriers to academic advancement for Jews in Austria forced him into the private practice of medicine. One of his main interests was neurology, the study of the…

    • 2466 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychoanalytic Theory

    • 713 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Sigmund Freud established a theory that was based on human behavior and personality, in which he called it, “Psychoanalytic Theory.” He worked with patients that suffered from mental illnesses, in which he believed that originated from their childhood experience. Not only does he believe that childhood experiences influence an individual’s behavior, their unconscious desires may be another reason for a juvenile’s delinquent behavior. When this theory was discovered, Freud involved three concepts…

    • 713 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The two types of theories that were mentioned in this book were social learning theory and Psychoanalytic theory. The social learning theory was developed by Albert Bandura. Social learning theory talks about that humans learn by observing other. This is also called modeling or observational learning. In simple terms, a child follows what others does and tries to do the same task. If a child sees their mother making food in some pots, and the child starts to pretend making food their toys is…

    • 271 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychoanalytic Film Theory

    • 15297 Words
    • 42 Pages

    Introduction Psychoanalytic film theory, despite its relatively late development, has become one of the most widely practiced theoretical approaches to cinema studies today. This is largely owing to the fact that psychoanalysis and film technology were born in the same era, and essentially grew up together. Thus, as cinema quickly came to focus on ways of rendering subjective experiences--the innermost psychological depths of the characters it portrayed--it naturally drew upon the newest conception…

    • 15297 Words
    • 42 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Weaknesses of Psychoanalytic Theory and Flawed Theory Freudian psychoanalysis focuses on uncovering unconscious motivations and breaking down defenses. Many therapists feel that psychoanalysis is the most effective technique to identify and deal with internal conflicts and feelings that contribute to dysfunctional behavior. The problem with the above information is this disorder needs to be diagnosed before it can be treated. Most individuals fail to report issues of stalkers due to the fear of…

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays