Psy 460 Week 2

Satisfactory Essays
PSY 460
Summary#3- Visual Imagery

The research study measured whether music therapy along side with visual imagery would decrease chemotherapy-induced anxiety and nausea-vomiting in patients going through chemotherapy. Researchers Karagozoglu, Tekayasar and Yilmaz (2013) sampled forty participants in the study, participants were provided with a document where they dispelled personal information, the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, a visual scale and a form to evaluation for nausea and vomiting (Karagozoglu, Tekyasar, and Yilmaz, 2013). The researchers used the same participants throughout the entire study. The results were significant which supported the hypothesis that music therapy along with visual imagery can cause a decrease chemotherapy-induced anxiety and nausea vomiting in chemotherapy patients. The study can support the notion that visual imagery can result in a form of relieving pain or stress.
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The researchers used a repeated measures design. In repeated-measures designs, researchers use the same participants throughout the whole study. Using a repeated-measures design can result in less error in the study. Future suggestions in the study would include testing different types of visual images on the visual scale to observe whether the type of image affects the results. Future research could apply the idea of music therapy and visual imagery to other treatment plans for illnesses that have debilitating symptoms.

References
Karagozoglu, S., Tekyasar, F., & Yilmaz, F. (2013). Effects of music therapy and guided visual imagery on chemotherapy-induced anxiety and nausea-vomiting. Journal Of Clinical Nursing, 22(1/2), 39-50. doi:10.1111/jocn.12030
Tonya Robinson
PSY 460
Article Summary # 2- Long-term, Short-term and Everyday

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