PS1 midterm

Frank Uribe 
Political Science 1 
Midterm Exam 
 
2. Discuss the Constitutional basis of Federalism to include enumerated, implied,  Inherent, and concurrent powers. 
The primary institutional feature of the U.S. Constitution was a political system in  which state governments share power with the national government; this political system  is called federalism. As opposed to a unitary system in which the central government  holds most of the power, or a confederation in which the regional governments hold the  majority of the power, a federalist system divides the power between a central  government and regional governments.  

The powers that each government has were given to them by the Constitution.  The powers granted to the national government by the Constitution are the enumerated  powers, the implied powers, and the inherent powers.   ●

Enumerated Powers. ​
The enumerated powers were directly written in the U.S.  Constitution, and they can be found in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution. The  powers of the national government fall into two categories, those for the common  defense and those for the general welfare, the powers for the common defense  include: define and punish maritime and international clients, the power to declare  war, and fund military service. The powers for the general welfare include, the  power to levy taxes, to borrow money, to regulate international and interstate  commerce, to coin money, and to make laws necessary to enforce the  Constitution. 



Implied Powers. ​
The implied powers are not directly stated in the US.  Constitution, but are “implied” that they exist. These powers come from a vague 

 

Frank Uribe 
Political Science 1 
Midterm Exam 
 
clause referred to as the “necessary and proper clause,” which is included in  Article I, Section 8. This clause gives the national government the power "to  make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the  foregoing powers." What this means is that Congress has the power to enact laws  necessary to carry out the enumerated powers. For example one of the enumerated  powers is the power to collect taxes; therefore the implied power is that Congress  establishes the IRS to collect taxes. 



Inherent Powers. ​
The national government possesses other types of powers;  these powers are the inherent powers. Like the implied powers, the inherent  powers are not specifically stated in the U.S. Constitution, but posses them simply  because the national government is sovereign; these powers are essential to  protect the citizens and defend its right to exist. An example of this is the right to  regulate immigration. 

The states also have certain powers granted to them by the Constitution. The 10th  amendment says that those powers not granted to the national government should go to  the states. They can establish their own, government as long as it doesn't conflict with the  U.S. Constitution or national statutes. Some examples of these powers include, the power  to establish local governments, to issue licenses, to regulate intrastate commerce, and to  conduct elections. 

Both, the national and state governments can independently exercise the same powers,  the power these powers are the concurrent powers. For example they both have the power  to collect taxes, and to make laws.  

 

Frank Uribe 
Political Science 1 
Midterm Exam 
 
Federalism was created to prevent tyranny by the national governments, to have  the national government share power with the state government, and so that no one  government reigns supreme. Another reason for federalism was to allow increased  political participation by the people, and for the states, it would create a testing ground  for new policies and programs. 

 
3. What constitutional rights do those accused of crimes have? Does the constitution  provide the right to privacy? Discuss the First Amendment principle of separation of ...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Midterm Essay
  • midterm Research Paper
  • Midterm Essay
  • Midterm Essay
  • Midterm Essay
  • Essay on Midterm
  • Essay on Midterm
  • Midterm Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free