Progressive Rock And Roll In The 1960's

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Music has been a way for artists and listeners to spread their message, values, and beliefs through song. Progressive Rock had more influence on its listeners in American society in the late 1960’s than music prior to this time. Rock and Roll in the 1950’s and early 1960’s was more about the sound of the music and having fun. The emergence of progressive rock changed all of that. Progressive rock was more serious with a message and meaning in its songs and lyrics. The late 1960’s was a difficult and progressive time in American society and progressive rock had a major influence on the values and beliefs of the younger generation. Rock and roll changed because the songs were changing. More artists and bands produced songs out of a studio …show more content…
Now many young people were in their 20’s and were aware of the problems and issues in American society. The demographics of the progressive rock movement were now black and white males and females in their 20’s and early 30’s . In 1964 the official start of the Vietnam War and the draft system in the United States split the country in two. Many were upset with 18 year olds going to war, but not being able to vote in an election. Barry Mcguire song Eve Of Destructions message was about the soldiers under 21 who have the right to kill and defend the United States but were not allowed to …show more content…
Songs had a political and societal meaning behind them, then songs in the past. The messages of progressive rock songs in the late 1960’s were important in making change in the American culture. Spreading messages of equal rights, love not war, and enjoying yourself through music, are not bad messages to sing about. America still faces issues like this today, but progressive rock helped start the conversation of change in America and lead to much more active change than ever before seen. Without progressive rock many of the issues and problems of the late 1960’s would have been delayed. Putting a meaning behind a song is the best way to express how you think and feel and progressive rock did just that in the late 1960’s. Freedom of expression through music lead to people living their lives with these values. Hippies in the late 60’s and 70’s were very influential in making changes in American culture and living a free and creative lifestyle. Hippies fought for what was wrong with American society. Hippies stood for many things like women’s rights, civil rights, and gay rights. Hippies were most prevalant during the 1960’s and 1970’s during major social changes in

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