Professionalism in Higher Education

Topics: Profession, Teacher, Higher education, Education, School / Pages: 20 (4767 words) / Published: Feb 18th, 2011
PROFESSIONALISM IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Introduction In the context of globalization, education becomes a perquisite for the supply of highly qualified and trained manpower. Education is seen not only as a key to social cohesion but also to mitigate the consequences of globalization. The fundamental requirement for global standards of education is the trained and professionally competent teachers. That a professionally competent teacher is indispensable even in the most well-equipped system of education is accepted by all. Those who teach effectively may make a progressive and productive society. On the contrary, poor teaching would lead to perpetuation of ignorance, misunderstanding, and intellectual and cultural stagnation. As it looks today, in the indian context, where there is an explosion of education enterprises, there is a great demand for good, qualified and committed teachers. The situation is also common to all the developing countries. Such good, qualified and committed teachers could not be possible if we cannot promote professionalism among teachers.
Professionalism: Meaning In a vital and rapidly evolving society the words "profession" and "professional" elude precise definition. For a long period in the West there were three recognised learned professions, theology, law and medicine. These had a prestige which was highly prized and zealously guarded.
Then architecture, and later engineering, came to be accepted as professions. With the recognition that there are numerous callings which demand disciplined and scholarly training, the designation "Profession" has come to be claimed by still other occupations. Dentistry, teaching, journalism, librarianship, forestry and nursing are some callings to which the status of profession is generally conceded in mature societies, and the list is by no means complete. It may be that the words "profession" and "professional" will cease to be associated with specific



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