Princess Diana Eulogy Analysis

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Topics: Diana
August 30, 1997. Princess Diana enters the doors of a hospital, barely surviving a car crash. Everyone around her fears for her life. She has trouble breathing and her heart eventually stops. The doctors try to save her, but she is far gone. Princess Diana of Wales is dead. Upon learning this, her country becomes engulfed in sadness, depression, and overall despair. After Diana’s death, the entire world is affected, and one of those affected is Earl Spencer, her brother. Spencer delivers a eulogy for Princess Diana on September 6, 1997.
Spencer’s eulogy for Diana has the intent of honoring her memory, and helping people understand who Diana was underneath the surface. Spencer effectively proves to the audience that Diana was a good person throughout her life. Effective arguments include three qualities: Ethos, (character appeals) Pathos, (emotional appeals) and Logos (logical appeals.) Spencer utilizes all three to honor his sister. The use of the Logos appeal is occasional, but still relevant. Earl Spencer’s eulogy for Princess Diana honors her memory effectively.
Spencer primarily uses the Pathos approach (as expected as this speech is a eulogy.) He frequently uses loaded words and phrases, such as “Diana was the very essence of
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His intent of the eulogy was to pay his respects to his sister, which is done using Pathos, (emotional appeals) Logos, (logical appeals) and Ethos (character appeals.) Because this is a eulogy, the use of Pathos is predominantly used, because Spencer wants to pull at the audience’s heart strings and ensure that the world remembers Diana in a positive way. However, Ethos is used so that the audience knows the speech Spencer presented is accurate and not falsified. The use of Logos is occasional in this eulogy, but it is still relevant. Spencer’s eulogy for Princess Diana was effective in honoring her and letting the world know who she

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