Primary Education in Sub Saharan Africa

Best Essays
| Primary education in sub-Saharan Africa | | | 3/19/2012 | Policy Briefing Paper | | Primary education and enrolment levels in sub-Saharan Africa remain a major development issue in the 21st century. The region has seen levels of primary enrollment climb from 47% to 87% since 1950 (UN 2010). It is now evident that nearly everywhere in the world; there are currently more children in receipt of primary education than 15 years ago. Nevertheless, 15% of all children around the globe, and 25% of children in sub-Saharan Africa still do not. (UN 2010) |
Figure 1 Children receiving primary education. (UN 2010)
Figure 1 Children receiving primary education. (UN 2010)

Policy Briefing Paper
Why does it constitute a development issue?

Although there has been some progress in the proportions of children of primary school age actually receiving and completing primary education, about 100 million children worldwide are still denied this right. Not surprisingly, most of these children live in developing countries.

Figure 2 Children of primary school age not primary education. Expressed in millions (One 2012)
Figure 2 Children of primary school age not primary education. Expressed in millions (One 2012)

Figure 3 Distribution of out-of-school children by region. (UN 2010)
Figure 3 Distribution of out-of-school children by region. (UN 2010)

Jandhyala B. G. Tilak cited in the Journal of International Cooperation in Education (2009) stated that “The importance of basic education for development is widely acknowledged” before going on to say that “basic education constitutes one of the most important means by which the poorest society can improve their situation and guarantee a life of dignity for their citizens.” (Jandhyala B. G 2009) Therefore it is evident that basic education particularly at a primary level should be a main component of any development strategy.

Many people accept that development in education could be a catalyst to help achieve



References: Dolan, S. (2012). Thanks to supporters, the Schools for Africa programme is reaching millions. Available: http://www.unicef.org/education/index_61242.html Last accessed 15/03/2012 Ford, L and Kavuma, R One.org. (2012). Education in sub-Saharan Africa. Available: http://www.one.org/c/us/progressreport/776/. Last accessed 15/03/2012. Potter et al. (2008). Chapter 5: People in the development process. In: Geographies of Development: An Introduction to Development Studies. 3rd ed. London: Prentice Hall. 222-224. Riddell, A (On behalf of UNESCO). (2003). The introduction of free primary education in sub-Saharan Africa. Available: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0014/001469/146914e.pdf. Last accessed 15/03/2012. The World Bank United Nations Summit. (2010). Goal 2 Achieve Universal Primary Education. In: High-level Plenary meeting of the General assembly. New York: UN Department of Public Information. UNESCO

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    According to Unicef’s Convention of the Rights of a Child, articles Right to Education and Goals of Education state that all children should have the right to free primary education and should be encouraged and aided in following their passions and interests past their time in school (A Summary of the Rights). In Syria the education system is made a priority and the first nine years of schooling are compulsory and free(Ménacère). The same can be said for schooling in Sierra Leone and Nigeria, with nine years required and funded by the government(Class Base).Unfortunately, as a result of the war, nine years of schooling is impractical and generally attending six years is the most possible (Class Base). Future success depends greatly on schooling and on the quality of that schooling. Unicefs studies of modern third world countries revealed the actual effects of education per each year, “...each additional year of maternal education helps reduce the child mortality rate by 2% [and] every additional year of education can increase a person’s future income by an average of 10%(Education in Developing Countries).” In a controlled and calm environment positive effects of schooling are amplified greatly and can extend even beyond the basic outcomes of general education. Nigeria has the second highest number of children out of school…

    • 1285 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The object of education, is to prepare young children to educate themselves throughout their lives, but schools in third world countries do not have this opportunity. The third world education system needs first world help. However, the first world is not fulfilling their global responsibilities to help these countries. Children in third world counties, such as Haiti and Papa New Guinea, deserve a better education and more support. Education in the third world faces challenges, because of the lack of resources, making the schools struggle with, supplies, facilities and teachers. Therefore, children wherever they are born deserve an equal education.…

    • 788 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    There are 775.4 million people around the world that cannot read of write a simple sentence, in some countries a child can spend 2-3 years repeating a grade but once kids leave school, most never return losing the opportunity to a successful job ("Main Navigation"). In some countries a child can spend 2-3 years repeating a grade, but once kids leave school, most never return. Amartya Sen has defined poverty stating that it is the lack of capability to function effectively in society. Therefore the lack of education in a country can be considered a form of poverty. Absolute poverty is the absence of adequate resources, kids in developing countries are faced with challenges of learning through poor nutrition, health, home circumstances and parental education. This discourages enrolment, reducing learning in schools ("Poverty and Education").…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Odey, S. I. (2008). Issues in Child Education and Social Development. Jos: Ehindero (Nig.) Limited.…

    • 4848 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    According to the Kenyan government, education is “A long term objective to provide basic quality education to enhance Kenyans ability to preserve and utilize the environment for productive and sustainable livelihoods, to develop quality of the human race; to realize the universal access to education and training for all including the disadvantaged and the vulnerable and as a necessary tool for development and protection of the democratic institutions of human rights” (Ministry Of Education Science and Technology, 2005 pp2).…

    • 1253 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    5. On the other hand, we often ― and properly ― hear about the 61 million children of primary school age who do not enjoy this benefit. Those living in poor, conflict-scarred countries. Those living with disabilities. Or ― far too often ― girls.…

    • 2866 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Akyeampong, K. (Centre for International Education, University of Sussex, England) in his lecture on “50 Years of Educational Progress and Challenge in Ghana”, at Parliament House, London, England; 2007…

    • 2430 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Sudan Education

    • 18228 Words
    • 73 Pages

    Glossary Acknowledgements Foreword: South Sudan – time to act Executive Summary 1. An education system under pressure 2. Current levels of development assistance 3. Accelerating the catch up 4. Closing the gap – delivering on the promise Conclusion Endnotes List of Figures…

    • 18228 Words
    • 73 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Educating Girls

    • 770 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Ruth Levine estimates that 104-121 million of children are not in primary school. Low levels of enrollment and completion are concentrated on not only in certain regions, but also among certain segments of population. Beyond the primary school enrollment and completion trends, a complex…

    • 770 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cited: "Education in Ethiopia." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 11 Feb. 2013. Web. 25 Nov. 2013. .…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    A school is a place purposefully established to facilitate the whole process of teaching and learning subject to measurement and evaluation. It expected to facilitate the process of learners acquiring knowledge, skills and attitudes that are essential in everyday human life. As Nyerere (1968) pointed out, at school, a child is expected to develop his mind to its maximum capacity. In the realization of this expectation a school should have sufficient human and material resources as important vehicles in facilitating the development of the learners in all aspects. The demand for the primary education in Tanzania is very high because if provide a base for national development. In essence the Tanzania development vision 2025 sees education as a critical factor in creating the mind necessary for national development. Moreover, education creates the competitive economy that will be the driving force for the realization of the vision (Maliyamkono and Mason, 2006). The fact is that up to now it is the only level in the education system supplies the majority of the people in the work force in the national economy in the country particularly in the private sector, agriculture being the leading one. For this…

    • 4059 Words
    • 15 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education which Target is to Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling. The indicators which measure education concearns are, 6. Net enrolment ratio in primary education (UNESCO), 7. Proportion of pupils starting grade 1 who reach grade 5 (UNESCO) and 8. Literacy rate of 15-24 year-olds (UNESCO).…

    • 961 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In the quarter century between 1966 and 1991, primary school enrolment increased from 72,000 to 287,000 and secondary school enrolment from 1900 to 60 000. Today in 1999 the figures stand at 340,000 and 152,000 respectively. Teacher training students’ stand at about 3000 and university students (full-time and part-time within Botswana) approach 8000 (parson, 1999).…

    • 7512 Words
    • 31 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Whole School Development

    • 8272 Words
    • 34 Pages

    Finally, in 1987 Ghana embarked upon what could well be described as one of the most ambitious programmes of educational reforms in sub-Saharan Africa based largely on the recommendations of the Dzobo commission. The education reforms were part of a national economic recovery plan which began with a restructuring of the school system, a process validated and accelerated by the global agenda of Education for All following the Jomtien Conference in 1990. Prior to the reforms, basic education had been affected by a crippling economic decline with devastating consequences on the quality and efficiency of education provision and delivery. The proportion of GDP devoted to education had declined from 6.4% in 1976 to about 1.0% in 1983 and 1.7% in 1985 (World Bank, 1996).…

    • 8272 Words
    • 34 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Researches

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Further, Sessional Paper No 1 of 2005 on Policy for Education. Training and Research regards the implementation of primary education as the perfect vehicle for attainment of Primary Education.…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays