Power in Politically Charged Networks Article Review
Topics: Social network, Scientific method, Sociology, Game theory / Pages: 2 (485 words) / Published: Sep 9th, 2014

Power in Politically Charged Networks Review
Engineering Logistics
Jason M. Smith was the lead author in Power in Politically Charged Networks; he also has his Masters in Finance through Washington State with interest in economics of information, market microstructure, financial markets and social network analysis in the area of finance. After finishing his article I felt that is was about identifying a powerful position such as its resources and networks, and estimating future outcomes between two competitive powers. Smith offered theories of ways to measure powerful nodal positions with allies and adversaries and understanding the types of networks that involve individuals, groups, organizations, or nations. He also introduces using PII (Political Independence Index) for future researchers to use as a starting point to research issues such as networks adopting weapons of mass destruction programs or other levels of threats. In the beginning of the article the author begins to distinguish sources of network of positional power to understand which positions in a network are more powerful. He explains that the positions have two things; access (resources from networks) and control (remaining control of these sources and having others using a different source than their own). He generalizes these two areas into Power-as-access approach and Power-as-control approach. The author then introduces PII or Political Independence Index which he explains can be used “… to better capture power from a control perspective in a politically charged network (Smith, Jason M. Social Networks, 2013)”. Later in the article the author offers two ways to understanding PII by comparing how it assesses nodal power versus existing measures of power and dependence using two datasets of network alliances and antagonistic relationships (Reads and The Sampson). By using PII in International Politically charged networks as a way to predict outcomes, Smith explains the PII is used to



References: Smith, Jason, Daniel Halgin, Virginie Kidwell-Lopez, Giuseppe Labianca, Daniel Brass, and Stephen Borgatti. "Power in Politically Charged Networks." Social Networks 36 (2013): 162-76. Web. 1 Jan. 2014. <www.elsevier.com/locate/socnet>.

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