Post traumatic stress disorder

Life after Trauma

Abstract
Post-traumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that some people develop after going through a stressful and dangerous event. This widespread disorder can affect individuals psychologically, emotionally and behaviorally following the experience of a traumatic event.
Not all individuals who are exposed to a traumatic event develop PTSD; researches hypothesized that biological and environmental factors contribute simultaneously to the development of PTSD. In order to better understand the disorder, this paper focuses on the possible risk and resilience factors of PTSD, its symptoms, its biological environmental contribution and types of treatment. In conclusion, the paper advocates the interrelated nature of the disorder and suggests the next steps needed in research to better prevent and overcome the disorder.
Life after Trauma Living with post-traumatic stress disorder is a continuous challenge to all of its victims. The most common types of event leading to the development of PTSD are war combat, rape, torture, childhood neglect and physical abuse, physical attack, natural disasters and other disasters such as plane crashes. Anyone can get PTSD at any age but a mix of risk factors make it more likely, namely: the mental risks a person may inherit such as an increased risk in anxiety and depression and the aspects of his/her personality; the early life experiences and severity of trauma a person may be exposed to; the structure of the brain and the genetic makeup a person holds and finally the social support a person receives after the event. The symptoms this disorder can be categorized into three groups: re-experiencing symptoms, avoidance symptoms, and hyper arousal symptoms. Psychotherapy, medication or both can treat PTSD. The next step for PTSD research is to discover new medications to target underlying causes of the disorder in order to prevent it. As well as work on the personality of



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