Portrayal Of The Characters In 'Lantana'

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‘None of the characters in Lantana are particularly attractive. All are deeply flawed human beings.' Discuss whether you agree with this statement.

Lantana delves into the world of the middle-aged and married, and gives the audience insight into the crises they face and the resolution and conclusion to their mid-life melodramas. Throughout the text we see each characters ability to deceive both themselves and others and this is discovered through not only the powerfully driven narrative of the text, but is represented also by the actors and the filmic techniques used to exemplify each theme and character.

Jane is lonely and lives a very unsatisfying and unfulfilled life and not only does she drag herself into oblivion with her transient

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