Porter Five Forces Analysis

Topics: Strategic management, Porter five forces analysis, Line of business Pages: 6 (1494 words) Published: October 2, 2013
Porter five forces analysis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A graphical representation of Porter's Five Forces
Porter five forces analysis is a framework for industry analysis and business strategy development. It draws upon industrial organization (IO) economics to derive five forces that determine the competitive intensity and therefore attractiveness of a market. Attractiveness in this context refers to the overall industry profitability. An "unattractive" industry is one in which the combination of these five forces acts to drive down overall profitability. A very unattractive industry would be one approaching "pure competition", in which available profits for all firms are driven to normal profit.

Three of Porter's five forces refer to competition from external sources. The remainder are internal threats.

Porter referred to these forces as the micro environment, to contrast it with the more general term macro environment. They consist of those forces close to a company that affect its ability to serve its customers and make a profit. A change in any of the forces normally requires a business unit to re-assess the marketplace given the overall change in industry information. The overall industry attractiveness does not imply that every firm in the industry will return the same profitability. Firms are able to apply their core competencies, business model or network to achieve a profit above the industry average. A clear example of this is the airline industry. As an industry, profitability is low and yet individual companies, by applying unique business models, have been able to make a return in excess of the industry average.

Porter's five forces include - three forces from 'horizontal' competition: the threat of substitute products or services, the threat of established rivals, and the threat of new entrants; and two forces from 'vertical' competition: the bargaining power of suppliers and the bargaining power of customers.

This five forces analysis, is just one part of the complete Porter strategic models. The other elements are the value chain and the generic strategies. Porter developed his Five Forces analysis in reaction to the then-popular SWOT analysis, which he found unrigorous and ad hoc.[1] Porter's five forces is based on the Structure-Conduct-Performance paradigm in industrial organizational economics. It has been applied to a diverse range of problems, from helping businesses become more profitable to helping governments stabilize industries.

Porter five forces analysis is a framework for industry analysis and business strategy development formed by Michael E. Porter of Harvard Business School in 1979.

Five force
Threat of new entrants
Profitable markets that yield high returns will attract new firms. This results in many new entrants, which eventually will decrease profitability for all firms in the industry. Unless the entry of new firms can be blocked by incumbents, the abnormal profit rate will trend towards zero (perfect competition). The existence of barriers to entry (patents, rights, etc.) The most attractive segment is one in which entry barriers are high and exit barriers are low. Few new firms can enter and non-performing firms can exit easily. Economies of product differences

Brand equity
Switching costs or sunk costs
Capital requirements
Expected retaliation
Access to distribution
Customer loyalty to established brands
Absolute cost
Industry profitability; the more profitable the industry the more attractive it will be to new competitors. Threat of new entrants, sources. 1)Economies of scale, 2)Product differentiation, 3)Cost disadvantages independent of size, 4)Access to distribution channels, 5)Government Policy.

Threat of substitute products or services

The existence of products outside of the realm of the common product boundaries increases the propensity of customers to switch to alternatives. For example, tap water might be considered a...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Essay on Porter Five Forces Analysis
  • Beyond Porter Five Forces Essay
  • Swot, Pest, Porte's Five Forces Analysis Essay
  • The Five Forces-General Assumption Essay
  • Porter's Five Forces of Competition Research Paper
  • Porter's Five Forces Model Essay
  • Porter Essay
  • Essay about Strategic management and business analysis

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free