Popular Culture In The 1960's

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A CENTURY OF CHANGE

The Twentieth Century was a time of great social, political, economic and cultural change and conflict. The impact of these events on people can be seen in popular culture. It not only reflected the thoughts and feelings of many but helped shape how they responded to these changes and conflicts. During each decade popular culture played a significant part in motivating large numbers of people to act for and achieve change. Popular culture in the 1960’s, e.g. Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll, helps historians understand how changes reflected and influenced the thoughts of that time. Youths began to think that taking drugs and having sex was a natural and ‘trendy’ thing to carry out. The decade saw major changes like the rise
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The community wanted peace and began to protest against war and rebelled against what was expected. Part and parcel with anti-war marches, petitions, picket signs, were the small round colourful political buttons like "Make Love, Not War", "Get out of Vietnam", "End the War.", "Yankee, Come Home" and many others (James Sayre, 2008).This was the generation of the baby boomers becoming teenagers and when the ‘hippies’ came about. This movement was for promoting the idea of peace, love, unity and freedom and for growing your consciousness to a whole new level, where mere materialistic concepts of life do not affect the way you perceive the world anymore (Phychedelic Junction, 2010). The University of Minnesota state ‘Their solution was to explore psychedelics. The most common drug was LSD, a chemical discovered in 1943 by Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann. LSD let people look at things with the different angle their psychedelic trance allowed them’ (Bacig, T, 2012).It was popular to use those drugs within the youth society. Medicals advances appeared such as the birth control pill known as ‘The Pill’ which became very popular to women during the rise of feminism. It had a significant impact in changing how society was organized as youths believed having sex was enjoyable now a contraceptive had been introduced and the behaviour of young women became more sexually …show more content…
2003. Popular culture. [ONLINE] Available at:http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/popular+culture. [Accessed 09 September 12]. James Sayre. 2008. Popular culture. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.bottlebrushpress.com/antivietnamwarprotests.html. [Accessed 09 September 12].
Born to be wild- Steppenwolf; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgOToIJ6IRc
Road Junky. 2006. A history of LSD - Hoffman, Leary. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.roadjunky.com/guide/834/a-history-of-lsd-hoffman-leary. [Accessed 09 September 12].
Ties 'n ' cuffs. 2011. Men’s Fashion During The 1960′s. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.tiesncuffs.com.au/blog/index.php/mens-fashion-1960s/. [Accessed 09 September 12].
Phychedelic Junction. 2010. The Hippie Movement - History, Culture and Legacy. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.psychedelicjunction.com/2010/08/hippie-movement-history-culture-and.html. [Accessed 01 September 12]
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