Police Brutality in NYC

Topics: Police, Police brutality, Police officer Pages: 5 (1430 words) Published: December 3, 2013


Police Brutality in NYC

Police brutality is the use of excessive physical force, including beating citizens with hands or batons, or using guns, and even lethal weapons. For the vast majority of citizens, this is something they never have experienced. Many police officers go their entire careers without ever having to draw their weapon or even engage in a serious physical confrontation in order to protect themselves or the public from an offender. A very small percentage of law enforcement officials, however are guilty of using excessive force against suspects without reason to do so. Police hold the responsibility of protecting the citizens of the communities they serve. They play an important role in keeping our communities safe, and in most cases, most policemen and women perform this job admirably. In tense situations, there are times when police are called on to make quick decisions in difficult circumstances in order to protect their own safety and that of innocent bystanders. However, in any situation where aggressive police behavior raises questions about the appropriateness of the reaction, it is important to investigate the accusations promptly and thoroughly. This is necessary in order to protect the community from the few police who choose to abuse their power, and also to maintain the

community's confidence in the honest men and women who work hard to protect their communities.

Police are responsible for protecting the citizens of the communities they serve. Any form of brutality by police should be immediately and thoroughly investigated in order to protect communities, and to preserve respect for and cooperation with police forces. As of 2012, there were an estimated 800,000 police officers in the US. It must be clearly stated that incidents of police brutality involve only a tiny fraction of police officers. The vast majority perform their jobs satisfactorily while respecting citizens' constitutional rights. A very small percentage of law enforcement officials, however, are guilty of using excessive force against suspects without reason to do so. Although such actions are illegal--both in the United States and in many other countries—many incidents of police brutality go unreported and unprosecuted. In recent years, video cameras have become common both in squad cars, facing in front of the car, where interactions with citizens take place after motor vehicle stops, and in police stations, where prisoners are held and transported. Besides that, with the camera phones, common citizens are able to quickly and discretely record incidents of police violence that they happen to witness. As a result, it has become increasingly difficult to ignore allegations of police brutality when video footage of such incidents may exist.

With increased attention being paid to incidents of police brutality, lawsuits being brought against both the officers and the government for which they work, and a focus on the psychological conditions that may affect those officers that violently abuse citizens, there is

hope that police brutality can be better understood, reduced, and eventually eradicated. When Americans think of the history of police brutality, there are several historical events that form the backdrop for this social problem. Although thousands of undocumented and unrecorded incidents of police brutality undoubtedly have occurred, it was not until the advent of videotape that Americans who previously had no knowledge of police brutality began to truly understand this issue. The Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s was accompanied by many incidents of police brutality committed against African Americans and their supporters. The pictures and videos of these incidents, broadcast on national television, included nonviolent protestors being tear-gassed, beaten with billy clubs, and even sprayed with fire hoses.

In February 2012 in New...

Citations: May 15, 2012 Tuesday
Health Reference Center Academic
Scherer, Ron. "N.Y.C. starts healing process after brutality case." Christian Science Monitor 29 Aug. 1997: 4. Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 6 May 2013.
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