Philosophy of Nursing

Topics: Health care, Health care provider, Patient Pages: 6 (1980 words) Published: January 22, 2014
Abstract: This paper explores the personal nursing philosophy I plan to convey in my nursing career. I believe the nature of nursing is rooted in commitment to public service and the undeniable desire to help those in need. Nursing is more than treating an illness; rather it is focused on delivering quality patient care that is individualized to the needs of each patient. My philosophy of nursing incorporates the knowledge of medicine while combining it with relational, compassionate caring that respects the dignity of each patient. I believe nursing care should be holistic while honoring patient values. A crucial aspect of nursing is interprofessional relationships, and collaborative efforts among healthcare professionals promote quality patient care. My philosophy of nursing extends to my community in which health promotion is something I will continually strive for.

Personal Philosophy of Nursing
For as long as I can remember I have been overwhelmed with a longing desire to care for those in need, and I feel this ultimately led me to the career choice of nursing. I feel most fulfilled when I am serving and caring for others, and my personal nursing attitude is one that is centered on compassion and service. According to Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary (2012), a philosophy is “an analysis of the grounds of and concepts expressing fundamental beliefs,” and before entering to the profession of nursing, it is important to explore my personal values and principles that will guide my nursing practice. My philosophy of nursing incorporates the knowledge of medicine while combining it with relational, compassionate caring that respects the dignity of each patient. My philosophy is one that focuses on the empowerment each patient in the delivery of holistic nursing care. This paper will explore the values I feel are necessary in relating to patients as well as health professionals, my personal work culture, and society as a whole. Personal Philosophy

The Nature of Nursing
The nature of nursing is something that cannot be simplified to one word or phrase. Nursing is more than a profession; it is more than treating those who are ill, rather it is a model of care and service to others, and it is continually evolving. The nature of nursing revolves around commitment to public service and an undeniable desire to help those in need. It is my belief that crucial aspects of nursing include the prevention of illness, the treatment of the ill, and the promotion of health, as well as caring for clients. Caring acknowledges what is important to the patient (Austgard, 2006), and I feel this shapes the delivery of nursing care. I believe to say that caring is not intertwined with nursing is to say that breathing has nothing to do with oxygen; for the two go hand and hand, and nursing would not be what it is without its aspect of caring, just like breathing would not be possible without oxygen. The nature of nursing should revolve around respect for each patient and reverence of human dignity. The nature of nursing is also rooted in science and medical knowledge. It is the goal to prevent illness and treat those who are ill, and this requires a base level of medical knowledge to make nursing care possible. Since the medical field is something that is continually evolving, nurses must keep up to date with the current best practices and delivery of patient care. Nursing is a process that requires continual research and learning. Nursing and Patient Care

In regards to nursing and patient care, my philosophy of nursing focuses on holistic, patient-centered care, as well as a caring and compassionate patient relationship. A holistic view of the patient allows the nurse to connect with patients on a relational level in which nurses get to understand the values of patients, and this kind of practice separates physician care from nursing care. “Holism involves studying and understanding the interrelationships...

References: Austgard, K. (2006). The aesthetic experience of nursing. Nursing Philosophy 7, 11-19.
Dossey, B. (2010). Holistic nursing: from Florence nightingale’s historical legacy to 21st century global nursing. Alterative Therapies 16(5), 14-15.
Malinowski, A., & Stamler, L.L. (2002). Comfort: exploration of the concept in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing 39(6), 599–606.
McCurry, M. K., Revell, S.H., Roy, C. (2009). Knowledge for the good of the individual and society: linking philosophy, disciplinary goals, theory, and practice. Nursing Philosophy 11, 42-52.
Philosophy. (n.d.). In Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary (11th edition). Retrieved May 26, 2012, from http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/philosophy
Wood, V., Flavell, A., Vanstolk, D., Bainbridge, L., & Nasmith, L. (2009). The road to collaboration: developing an interprofessional competency framework. Journal of Interprofessional Care 23(6), 621-629. doi: 10.3109/13561820903051477
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