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Philosophy of Healthcare

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Philosophy of Healthcare
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Seven Points of Philosophy of Healthcare
Tamar J. Aviles
Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences
Philosophy of Healthcare Final Project 2
Abstract
This paper analyzes seven view points on the topic of Philosophy of Healthcare. The seven view points are blended into this paper by discussing what factors highly influenced my decision to choose healthcare as my set profession in life. Also discussing the Nature of Mankind, stating a few qualities that are highly important in our society and give examples of how it is used in our everyday life. This paper will further discuss the Brokenness of Mankind and what I believe are my most important qualities that I will be able to bring into the medical field. Discuss different ways how handle conflict and stress that can someday lead to “burnout” in healthcare. Along the topic of talking about the Brokenness of Mankind, I will debate if there is a difference between healing and curing. Last, I will altercate the Value of Mankind and in what ways this could be appropriate for faith to play a part in giving care in healthcare.
Keywords: none.

Philosophy of Healthcare Final Project 3
Seven Points of Philosophy of Healthcare Back when I was a young child in elementary school, my first grade teacher asked me and all my other classmates, “What do you want to be when you grow up?!” One girl said a private eye investigator; a boy who played on the peewee football team for our city said he wanted to be the quarterback of any NFL team. When it was finally my turn to say what I wish to do for the rest of my life, I said I wanted to be a professional ice skater! I came to realize six years later that that was never going to be my reality and I had to think about what really would interest me. One good quality everyone said I obtained was caring for others and how I always am the first to aid someone in need. I spent most of my time in the hospital visiting my grandmother and I always



References: "The Healthcare Environment - Avoiding Conflict and Stress at Work." EzineArticles Submission - Submit Your Best Quality Original Articles For Massive Exposure, Ezine Publishers Get 25 Free Article Reprints. Brent McNutt, 28 Apr. 2009. Web. 30 Nov. 2010. . "Stress in the Workplace: A Costly Epidemic." Fairleigh Dickinson University (FDU). Rebecca Maxon, June-July 1999. Web. 30 Nov. 2010. . "The Difference Between Healing and Curing- Beliefnet.com." Inspiration, Spirituality, Faith, Religion.- Beliefnet.com. Christiane Northrup, M.D. Web. 30 Nov. 2010. . "The Difference between Healing And Curing." The Body Luminous - Energy Healings, Massage, and Alternative Medicine :: The Luminous Journey -- Classes and Workshops in Komyo Reiki and Munay-Ki :: Steps on the Path -- Products for Your Spiritual Journey and Healing Practice. Sylvia Robinson, 2010. Web. 30 Nov. 2010. .

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