Philippine Revolt Against Spain

Topics: Philippines, Bohol, Francisco Dagohoy Pages: 11 (4091 words) Published: February 20, 2013
Philippine revolts against Spain
During the Spanish colonial period in the Philippines, there were several revolts against of the Spanish colonial government by native-born Filipinos and Chinese, often with the goal of re-establishing the rights and powers that had traditionally belonged to tribal chiefs and Chinese traders. Most of these revolts failed because the majority of the native population sided up with the Spanish colonial government and fought with the Spanish to put down the revolts. The most important of those revolts led to the expulsion of a number of Chinese from the Philippines, but they were later allowed to return. * 1 16th century * 1.1 Dayami Revolt (1567) * 1.2 Lakandula and Sulayman Revolt (1574) * 1.3 Pampangenos Revolt (1585) * 1.4 Conspiracy of the Maharlikas (1587-1588) * 1.5 Revolts Against the Tribute (1589) * 1.6 Magalat Revolt (1596) * 2 17th century * 2.1 Igorot Revolt (1601) * 2.2 The Chinese Revolt of 1603 * 2.3 Tamblot Revolt (1621-1622) * 2.4 Bancao Revolt (1621-1622) * 2.5 Itneg Revolt (1625-1627) * 2.6 Cagayan Revolt (1639) * 2.7 Ladia Revolt(1643) * 2.8 Sumuroy Revolt (1649-50) * 2.9 Maniago Revolt (1660) * 2.10 Malong Revolt (1660-1661) * 2.11 Almazan Revolt (January 1661) * 2.12 Chinese Revolt of 1662 * 2.13 Panay Revolt (1663) * 3 18th century * 3.1 Dagohoy Rebellion (1744-1829) * 3.2 Agrarian Revolt of 1745 * 3.3 Silang Revolt (1762-1763) * 4 19th century * 4.1 Novales Revolt (1823) * 4.2 Cavite Mutiny (1872) * 4.3 Basi Revolt (1807) * 4.4 Pule Revolt (1840-1843) * 5 See also * 6 References|

16TH Century
Dayami Revolt (1567)
The Dayami Revolt was a revolt against Spanish colonial rule led by the Filipino rebel, Dayahi, in the island of Mactan in the Philippines, in 1567.[1] Lakandula and Sulayman Revolt (1574)
The Lakandula and Sulayman Revolt, also known as the Tagalog Revolt, was an uprising in 1574 against Spanish colonial rule led by Lakandula and Rajah Sulayman in Manila had a big land. The revolt occurred in the same year that the Chinese pirate Limahong attacked the palisaded yet poorly-defended enclosure of Intramuros. This Revolt was caused by losing Sulayman and Lakandula's kingdom when they were persuaded by Adelantado Legazpi to accept Spanish sovereignty on the promise that their people would be well-treated by the Spaniards. The Lakandula and Sulayman revolt or the Tagalog revolt can be considered a revolt for personal reason. When Gov. Gen. Laezaris replaced Legaspi, he revoked their exemptions from paying tribute and confiscated their lands. Father Marin convinced Lakandula and Sulayman to abort the revolt and promised to grant their privileges. But this act of Spaniards was motivated by the presence of Limahong in Manila. Pampangenos Revolt (1585)

The Pampangenos Revolt was an uprising in 1585 by some native Kapampangan leaders who resented Spanish landowners, or encomenderos who had deprived them of their historical land inheritances as tribal chiefs. The revolt included a plot to storm Intramuros, but the conspiracy was foiled before it could begin after a Filipino woman married to a Spanish soldier reported the plot to the Spanish authorities. Spanish and Filipino colonial troops were sent by Governor-General Santiago de Vera, and the leaders of the revolt were arrested and summarily executed by Christian Cruz-Herrera the great. Conspiracy of the Maharlikas (1587-1588)

The Conspiracy of the Maharllikas, or the Tondo Conspiracy, of 1587-1588, was a plot against Spanish colonial rule by the kin-related noblemen, or datus, of Manila and some towns of Bulacan and Pampanga. It was led by Agustin de Legazpi, nephew of Lakandula, and his first cousin, Martin Panga. The datus swore to revolt by anointing their necks with a split egg. The uprising failed when they were denounced to the Spanish authorities by Antonio...


References: Dayami Revolt (1567)
The Dayami Revolt was a revolt against Spanish colonial rule led by the Filipino rebel, Dayahi, in the island of Mactan in the Philippines, in 1567.[1]
Lakandula and Sulayman Revolt (1574)
The Lakandula and Sulayman Revolt, also known as the Tagalog Revolt, was an uprising in 1574 against Spanish colonial rule led by Lakandula and Rajah Sulayman in Manila had a big land
Pampangenos Revolt (1585)
The Pampangenos Revolt was an uprising in 1585 by some native Kapampangan leaders who resented Spanish landowners, or encomenderos who had deprived them of their historical land inheritances as tribal chiefs
Conspiracy of the Maharlikas (1587-1588)
The Conspiracy of the Maharllikas, or the Tondo Conspiracy, of 1587-1588, was a plot against Spanish colonial rule by the kin-related noblemen, or datus, of Manila and some towns of Bulacan and Pampanga
Revolts Against the Tribute (1589)
The Cagayan and Dingras Revolts Against the Tribute occurred on Luzon in the present-day provinces of Cagayan and Ilocos Norte in 1589
Magalat Revolt (1596)
The Magalat Revolt was an uprising in 1596, led by Magalat, a Filipino rebel from Cagayan
Igorot Revolt (1601)
By order of then Governor-General Francisco de Tello de Guzmán an expedition was sent to the Cordillera region for religious conversion serious purposes with the aid of Padre Esteban Marin
Tamblot Revolt (1621-1622)
The Tamblot Revolt or Tamblot Uprising was a religious uprising in the island of Bohol, led by Tamblot in 1621
Bancao Revolt (1621-1622)
The Bancao Revolt was a religious uprising against Spanish colonial rule led by Bancao, the datu of Carigara, in the present-day Carigara Philippine province of Leyte.
Cagayan Revolt (1639)
As a result of the British invasion and the revolutionary propaganda of Silang and Palaris, the flames of rebellion spread to Cagayan
Ladia Revolt(1643)
Pedro Ladia was a Bornean and a self-claimed descendant of Lakandula who came to Malolos in 1643
Sumuroy Revolt (1649-50)
In the town of Palapag today in Northern Samar, Juan Ponce Sumuroy, a Waray, and some of his followers rose in arms on June 1, 1649 over the polo y servicio system being undertaken in Samar
Maniago Revolt (1660)
Maniago Revolt led by Don Francisco Maniago, initially caused by natives ' protest against the polo and bandala, later became a struggle to free the natives from Spanish rule
Malong Revolt (1660-1661)
This revolt was led by Andres Malong, who led some natives in Pangasinan to take up arms against the Spanish government and proclaimed himself King of Pangasinan
Almazan Revolt (January 1661)
A part of the chain to the Malong Revolt was the Ilocos Revolt led by Don Pedro Almazan, illustrious and wealthy leader from San Nicolas, Laoag, Ilocos Norte
Panay Revolt (1663)
The Panay Revolt was a religious uprising in 1663 that involved Tapar, a native of the island of Panay, who wanted to establish a religious cult in the town of Oton
18th century
Dagohoy Rebellion (1744-1829)
Silang Revolt (1762-1763)
Silang Revolt (1762-1763) Arguably one of the most famous revolts in Philippine history is the Silang Revolt from 1762 to 1763, led by the couple of Diego Silang and Gabriela Silang
19th century
Novales Revolt (1823)
Cavite Mutiny (1872)
The Cavite Mutiny of 1872 was an uprising of military personnel of Fort San Felipe, the Spanish arsenal in Cavite, Philippines on January 20, 1872
Basi Revolt (1807)
The Basi Revolt, also known as the Ambaristo Revolt, was a revolt undertaken from September 16 to 28, 1807
Pule Revolt (1840-1843)
One of the most famous religious revolts is the Pule Revolt, more formally known as the Religious Revolt of Hermano Pule
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